12 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 1973’s The Plan, The Osmonds had already grown out of the constricting bubblegum parameters of their earliest albums. Here they embrace heady themes and styles, such as God’s existence (the thickly orchestrated “Are You Up There”), the end of time (the psych-soulful “The Last Days”), war (the metal-heavy “War in Heaven”), escapism (the brass-stoked rocker “One Way Ticket to Anywhere”), and existentialism (the funky “Mirror Mirror”). This multilayered concept shocker is prime rock ’n’ roll. But the bubblegum damage had been done; The Osmonds were hardly considered a heavy rock ’n’ roll band with serious black music influences. Too bad.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 1973’s The Plan, The Osmonds had already grown out of the constricting bubblegum parameters of their earliest albums. Here they embrace heady themes and styles, such as God’s existence (the thickly orchestrated “Are You Up There”), the end of time (the psych-soulful “The Last Days”), war (the metal-heavy “War in Heaven”), escapism (the brass-stoked rocker “One Way Ticket to Anywhere”), and existentialism (the funky “Mirror Mirror”). This multilayered concept shocker is prime rock ’n’ roll. But the bubblegum damage had been done; The Osmonds were hardly considered a heavy rock ’n’ roll band with serious black music influences. Too bad.

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