17 Songs, 58 Minutes

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

thoughtsthatcruz ,

Place Beyond the Pines - Soundtrack

Film Scoring is such a vital part of any film. This one particular I love the works of Mike Patton. I am very happy to have bough this soundtrack it is absolutely wonderful.

Ashi30 ,

Sensational!

Love the movie! Love the music! Terrific work by Patton & co. I had watery eyes when I heard Please Stay.

roestra ,

A Welcome Deviation

Brief Track Review:

Schenectady: A shivering palette of rickety percussion and distorted guitar, this is the defining theme of the film. (5/5)

Family Trees - Eclipse of the Son (Tracks 2-10): Sweeping orchestral pieces outline the bulk of this soundtrack, further accentuated by the recurring piano motifs sparsely sprinkled throughout. Fascinating arrangements. (4/5)

The Snow Angel: A dazzling display of expressiveness, given Mike's steadfast focus on using machinery instead of a typical orchestral complement. A brooding theme which recurs often in the film. A GREAT STARTING POINT.

Handsome Luke: Hard charging riffing through the awe-inducing climax of the film. Powerful closer.

Please Stay - The Wolves (Tracks 13-17): Timeless relics of the past interlaced throughout the film serve as a display of Patton's cultural sensibilities and his proclivity towards nostalgic orchestrations, not including the more recent Bon Iver piece, which is sequenced brilliantly at the closing of the film, his ardent, soft spoken "What might've been lost" perfectly unraveling a elusive message only previously underscored in the latter part of the film.

Mike Patton's latest engagement with film scoring is at once sweeping, emotive, and agnostically minimalist, functioning as a provocateur, a voyeur to the film's nimble cinematography, and as a historical snapshot of timeless compositions (i.e. The Cryin' Shames, Ennio, etc.). Needless to say, I found it oddly affecting, given the myriad of processed noise and flanger effect tinkering; it's a surprising, yet welcome deviation in an industry ripe with mediocrity.

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