9 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Talk Talk’s debut album is so unlike much of the group’s catalog that you could practically consider it a different band. Except those vocals could only come from one Mark Hollis, who even at his most commercially aimed has an ear for textures that go beneath the surface. The band did not yet include Tim Friese-Greene, a keyboard player and producer who would co-write with Hollis much of the band’s material. The band anthem, “Talk Talk” is here with a set of tunes that were often compared with the synth-heavy strains of Duran Duran, with whom they toured and shared a producer. A fair enough comparison, but with the advantage of time and listening to the group with their entire future catalog available, one can hear the roots of their moody melancholia in the pleading urgency of “It’s So Serious,” the epic grandeur of the six-minute title track, and the furious anxiety in the scrambling rhythms of “Hate.” In a sense, this album is tightly glued to the early ‘80s and its discovery of synthesizers and other new electronics. But there are some great tunes lurking in “Mirror Man” and “Candy.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Talk Talk’s debut album is so unlike much of the group’s catalog that you could practically consider it a different band. Except those vocals could only come from one Mark Hollis, who even at his most commercially aimed has an ear for textures that go beneath the surface. The band did not yet include Tim Friese-Greene, a keyboard player and producer who would co-write with Hollis much of the band’s material. The band anthem, “Talk Talk” is here with a set of tunes that were often compared with the synth-heavy strains of Duran Duran, with whom they toured and shared a producer. A fair enough comparison, but with the advantage of time and listening to the group with their entire future catalog available, one can hear the roots of their moody melancholia in the pleading urgency of “It’s So Serious,” the epic grandeur of the six-minute title track, and the furious anxiety in the scrambling rhythms of “Hate.” In a sense, this album is tightly glued to the early ‘80s and its discovery of synthesizers and other new electronics. But there are some great tunes lurking in “Mirror Man” and “Candy.”

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

HeyTheo ,

A Distinctive Sound...

This was, and continues to be, a very good album. I may be a little nostalgic about some 80s hidden gems like this, but I thought this was a groundbreaking sound. Many songs here are very good and showed early signs of the creativity the later efforts pushed. Many tracks are far
more inspired than the title track.

G3Chris1 ,

New Wave One Hit Wonder

Talk Talk, the song, was a breath of fresh air when it hit the charts. It's the measure against all other New Wave music is judged. The rest of the album sadly is unremarkable.

Dr. Jimmy/ Mr. Jim ,

More than just 80s Pop

Where are all the other reviews for this? Yeah, this album is different than Talk Talk's last three albums, but it is still a gem in its own right and gave Talk Talk a name to begin with. Most likely you're here for the eponymous, "Talk Talk" single, so now I'm telling you to buy the whole album with it! If you like the others you sample here, you will be glad you did. My only cursiosity is if this remastered version is missing some of the original luster? I have the original CD version which is a bit more distinct in sound, but not as loud in its presentation...but that's what volume is for!

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