12 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Produced by the great Chet Atkins and featuring contributions from premium session men — among them pedal-steel player Jimmy Day, drummer Johnny Bush and guitarist Grady Martin — 1967’s The Party’s Over is one of the strongest efforts from Willie Nelson’s Nashville period. All twelve songs are Willie originals, and each is a display of his unique blend of vulnerability, intelligence, and despondence. The closing verse of “Suffer In Silence” inhabits the darkest reaches of honkytonk existentialism: “Just suffer in silence, speak no bitter words / The world offers no sympathy / Though trouble surrounds you, and you long to be heard / Just suffer in silence, like me.” The album contains numerous moments of beautifully articulated despair, but they are tempered by the sweet and supple nature of Nelson’s voice — one of country music’s most caring and sophisticated instruments. Atkins’ stately production brings a dramatic weight to these tales of woe. The title song was a hit single, but there are many here that are just as good, if not better, including “Go Away,” “The Ghost,” “No Tomorrow In Sight” and “The End of Understanding.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Produced by the great Chet Atkins and featuring contributions from premium session men — among them pedal-steel player Jimmy Day, drummer Johnny Bush and guitarist Grady Martin — 1967’s The Party’s Over is one of the strongest efforts from Willie Nelson’s Nashville period. All twelve songs are Willie originals, and each is a display of his unique blend of vulnerability, intelligence, and despondence. The closing verse of “Suffer In Silence” inhabits the darkest reaches of honkytonk existentialism: “Just suffer in silence, speak no bitter words / The world offers no sympathy / Though trouble surrounds you, and you long to be heard / Just suffer in silence, like me.” The album contains numerous moments of beautifully articulated despair, but they are tempered by the sweet and supple nature of Nelson’s voice — one of country music’s most caring and sophisticated instruments. Atkins’ stately production brings a dramatic weight to these tales of woe. The title song was a hit single, but there are many here that are just as good, if not better, including “Go Away,” “The Ghost,” “No Tomorrow In Sight” and “The End of Understanding.”

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

ForrestCook ,

The Party's Over

I fell in love with this album in 1965 and it is STILL one of my favorite albums. It is Willie Nelson at his VERY BEST.

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