13 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Korn's 13th album is one of the group’s most searing, the band's trademark ugly-beautiful stomp meeting the savage charge of more extreme strains of metal. Much of the credit can be given to vocalist/raw nerve Jonathan Davis: In the aftermath of his wife's death in August 2018, an artist already renowned for plumbing emotional depths pushes his throat and lungs to visceral extremes: wailing, panting, whispering, and roaring. Preview singles "Cold" and "You'll Never Find Me" set the template for their new direction: hard syncopation, basement-scraping riffs, radio-unfriendly growls. But there are also some phoenix-like songs ("Can You Hear Me," "Finally Free") that juxtapose Davis' wounded lyrics with anthemic hookwork. He screams in metalcore ferociousness, gurgles in death-metal-fried agony, soars in power ballad majesty, and leaves the sounds of crying on the recording. His band is both fierce and desolate, with bassist Fieldy finding new sludgy lows and drummer Ray Luzier driving everything with a savage precision.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

Korn's 13th album is one of the group’s most searing, the band's trademark ugly-beautiful stomp meeting the savage charge of more extreme strains of metal. Much of the credit can be given to vocalist/raw nerve Jonathan Davis: In the aftermath of his wife's death in August 2018, an artist already renowned for plumbing emotional depths pushes his throat and lungs to visceral extremes: wailing, panting, whispering, and roaring. Preview singles "Cold" and "You'll Never Find Me" set the template for their new direction: hard syncopation, basement-scraping riffs, radio-unfriendly growls. But there are also some phoenix-like songs ("Can You Hear Me," "Finally Free") that juxtapose Davis' wounded lyrics with anthemic hookwork. He screams in metalcore ferociousness, gurgles in death-metal-fried agony, soars in power ballad majesty, and leaves the sounds of crying on the recording. His band is both fierce and desolate, with bassist Fieldy finding new sludgy lows and drummer Ray Luzier driving everything with a savage precision.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
287 Ratings

287 Ratings

Scout658 ,

Personally it’s amazing.

For me it feels like they are going back to their old sound from their debut and a mix of issues which personally my two favorite albums by them so I am excited to see what this album has to offer.

Whatzfaulk ,

Old elements, new sound

I personally think this album is amazing. I knew it was going to be dark because of John’s wife’s passing but my god. And to the people I see say “he whined about bad experiences through the 90’s and 2000’s, now we have to hear him whine about his wife”. You are clearly not capable of human emotion and empathy. The dude lost his wife of years, the mother of his children. That would wreck anyone and he found a way to channel that pain and grief into something positive. Grow up asshats

MikeTab ,

Continually Impressed

For those who say they want “old” Korn, go back and listen to self-titled. For those who appreciate this band for continually changing, rock on. Bands do not stick around for 25 years by doing the same thing. The new album seems to have elements of the past, but sounds different. This is a good thing. Not everything they do will please everyone, but I’m just extremely happy they don’t try to cater to everyone. Keep killing it and innovating, guys. Thank you for pouring your hearts and souls into your music.

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