18 Songs, 1 Hour 4 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the midst of recording landmark albums for Bob Dylan and The Neville Brothers at his New Orleans–based studio Kingsway (located inside a historic mansion on the outskirts of the French Quarter), Daniel Lanois found time to record his solo debut, 1989’s Acadie. The title refers to the historical connection between Lanois’ native Canada and the French-speaking Cajuns of Louisiana, and thematically, the music reopens the bridge between these seemingly incongruent cultures. Lanois sings in French on “O Marie,” “Jolie Louise,” and “Under a Stormy Sky,” all of which apply the producer’s famously tropical sound design to poignant and plainspoken melodies drawn from ancient folk tunes. Sonically, Acadie is directly related to Lanois’s previously collaborations with Brian Eno, U2, and the Nevilles, all of whom make guest appearances here. “The Maker” crossbreeds the bayou shuffles of The Neville Brothers with the sweeping grandeur of U2’s Joshua Tree. Meanwhile, “Ice” and “St. Ann’s Gold” hark back to Lanois’ instrumental duets with Eno. Though Lanois is a talented singer and songwriter, Acadie frequently shows that he can say just as much without any words at all.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the midst of recording landmark albums for Bob Dylan and The Neville Brothers at his New Orleans–based studio Kingsway (located inside a historic mansion on the outskirts of the French Quarter), Daniel Lanois found time to record his solo debut, 1989’s Acadie. The title refers to the historical connection between Lanois’ native Canada and the French-speaking Cajuns of Louisiana, and thematically, the music reopens the bridge between these seemingly incongruent cultures. Lanois sings in French on “O Marie,” “Jolie Louise,” and “Under a Stormy Sky,” all of which apply the producer’s famously tropical sound design to poignant and plainspoken melodies drawn from ancient folk tunes. Sonically, Acadie is directly related to Lanois’s previously collaborations with Brian Eno, U2, and the Nevilles, all of whom make guest appearances here. “The Maker” crossbreeds the bayou shuffles of The Neville Brothers with the sweeping grandeur of U2’s Joshua Tree. Meanwhile, “Ice” and “St. Ann’s Gold” hark back to Lanois’ instrumental duets with Eno. Though Lanois is a talented singer and songwriter, Acadie frequently shows that he can say just as much without any words at all.

TITLE TIME

More By Daniel Lanois

You May Also Like