13 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kneebody, which formed in Los Angeles in the early '00s, is basically a jazz quintet that sometimes draws on other styles. 2013’s The Line, its fourth album, displays how the group brings various musical strains together in unusual ways. Tenor saxophonist Ben Wendel and trumpeter Shane Endsley, who both employ effects, perform the fine horn arrangements. Interestingly, Wendel and Endsley don’t solo much; when they do, they keep their statements short and sweet. The opening cut, “Lowell,” comes off like a chunky descendent of the innovative '60s British jazz-rock group Soft Machine. The title track surges and simmers as Nate Wood pushes the band with hard-hitting drums. “E and E,” a sort of intro to “Pushed Away,” finds Kaveh Rastegar subtly layering quiet bass tones to moody effect. “Trite” rattles with energy as the band brings the piece’s tense, angular lines to life—check out Adam Benjamin’s agitated, distorted keyboard work. The dark, medium-tempo closer, “Ready Set Go,” stirs together metal, prog, and jazz to create an unholy stew.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kneebody, which formed in Los Angeles in the early '00s, is basically a jazz quintet that sometimes draws on other styles. 2013’s The Line, its fourth album, displays how the group brings various musical strains together in unusual ways. Tenor saxophonist Ben Wendel and trumpeter Shane Endsley, who both employ effects, perform the fine horn arrangements. Interestingly, Wendel and Endsley don’t solo much; when they do, they keep their statements short and sweet. The opening cut, “Lowell,” comes off like a chunky descendent of the innovative '60s British jazz-rock group Soft Machine. The title track surges and simmers as Nate Wood pushes the band with hard-hitting drums. “E and E,” a sort of intro to “Pushed Away,” finds Kaveh Rastegar subtly layering quiet bass tones to moody effect. “Trite” rattles with energy as the band brings the piece’s tense, angular lines to life—check out Adam Benjamin’s agitated, distorted keyboard work. The dark, medium-tempo closer, “Ready Set Go,” stirs together metal, prog, and jazz to create an unholy stew.

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