20 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Composer/longtime Steven Soderbergh collaborator Cliff Martinez says the director threw him a “big curveball” when it came time to score his Cinemax series. “As he was editing, he was using my music from Drive, Contagion, and Spring Breakers," Martinez explains, “which was a surprise because it didn't acknowledge the [show’s 1900] period whatsoever. It also proves a theory that as long as the music serves the dramatic functions of the film or TV show, it'll work." Martinez, an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame from his days drumming for The Red Hot Chili Peppers, says of the score’s electronic roots: “I had seen Kraftwerk at Disney Hall, and I kind of went, 'A-ha, that's it!' I realized I wanted to do something that sounded like the early pioneering stages of electronic music. They were one of the first main artists that I heard that made pop electronic music, so they were kind of an inspiration." Martinez also used guitars and an unusual favorite instrument, the Cristal Baschet, which “always makes an interesting contrast when you place it up against something that's overtly electronic and synthetic."

EDITORS’ NOTES

Composer/longtime Steven Soderbergh collaborator Cliff Martinez says the director threw him a “big curveball” when it came time to score his Cinemax series. “As he was editing, he was using my music from Drive, Contagion, and Spring Breakers," Martinez explains, “which was a surprise because it didn't acknowledge the [show’s 1900] period whatsoever. It also proves a theory that as long as the music serves the dramatic functions of the film or TV show, it'll work." Martinez, an inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame from his days drumming for The Red Hot Chili Peppers, says of the score’s electronic roots: “I had seen Kraftwerk at Disney Hall, and I kind of went, 'A-ha, that's it!' I realized I wanted to do something that sounded like the early pioneering stages of electronic music. They were one of the first main artists that I heard that made pop electronic music, so they were kind of an inspiration." Martinez also used guitars and an unusual favorite instrument, the Cristal Baschet, which “always makes an interesting contrast when you place it up against something that's overtly electronic and synthetic."

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

JCStahley ,

Very cool, very contemporary.

Cliff Martinez is a very specific choice for a period series: this score works in a way that an instrumental or orchestral or classical score just wouldn't work. I can't explain it exactly, but I would just say that it totally works and once you hear it with the show itself, you can't picture the music being anything other than this. I also like that it's very minimal and sparse but still very effective. The score is definitely part of the vibe of this show.

fernstyle ,

Eleven stars

Ethereal and visceral, and a perfect anachronistic accompaniment to Cinemax's The Knick. This is the only tv soundtrack I have ever purchased, and I listen to it multiple times a week - it is an interesting meditation choice if you're into that, and it makes for wonderful background music for creative writing or any other endeavors. Everyone who heard this ends up buying it, whether they watch the show or not!

SirRHP ,

Exquisite, Haunting…

Rarely do I write reviews on iTunes for anything. I think this only the second time I’ve done so actually. But I feel compelled to praise Cliff Martinez’s peerless work on The Knick. It’s a true testament to his work as an artist that he was able to create a modern sonic landscape for a television series that takes place 114 years ago but still completely fits. It’s rather breathtaking. I’ll wrap this up by saying this is the best music I have heard (and I am including all albums here, not just soundtracks) in all of 2014.

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