14 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A two-man Canadian garage-punk wrecking crew, the King Khan & BBQ Show is a must-hear act for fans of lovably vulgar rock ‘n’ roll. Their self-titled debut album — originally appearing in 2004, then re-released in expanded form in ’07 — is a lewd ‘n’ crude masterpiece of its kind. There are echoes of the Dictators, the New York Dolls, Hasil Adkins, and Sam the Sham reverberating within these sloppy slices of sonic mania. Khan and BBQ (a.k.a. Blacksnake and Mark Sultan) add an unexpected doo-wop vocal element to the proceedings, caterwauling together like Frankie Valli’s distaff cousins on “Waddlin’ Around,” “Love You So,” and “Shake Real Slow.” Relentless, filth-spattered rockers like “Fishfight” and “Pig Pig” invite outbursts of pogo dancing. The duo also ventures into rockabilly (“Am I the One”), ‘60s-scented bubblegum (“Bimbo’s Theme”) and Cramps-style ghoul rock (“Hold Me Tight”) with leering glee. Throughout, King Khan & BBQ radiate a sort of perverse innocence — these guys thrash and yelp their way through their tunes with the sincerity of hyperactive eight year-olds. This steaming mess of an album is evidence that rock can never be too simple, too stupid, or too much fun.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A two-man Canadian garage-punk wrecking crew, the King Khan & BBQ Show is a must-hear act for fans of lovably vulgar rock ‘n’ roll. Their self-titled debut album — originally appearing in 2004, then re-released in expanded form in ’07 — is a lewd ‘n’ crude masterpiece of its kind. There are echoes of the Dictators, the New York Dolls, Hasil Adkins, and Sam the Sham reverberating within these sloppy slices of sonic mania. Khan and BBQ (a.k.a. Blacksnake and Mark Sultan) add an unexpected doo-wop vocal element to the proceedings, caterwauling together like Frankie Valli’s distaff cousins on “Waddlin’ Around,” “Love You So,” and “Shake Real Slow.” Relentless, filth-spattered rockers like “Fishfight” and “Pig Pig” invite outbursts of pogo dancing. The duo also ventures into rockabilly (“Am I the One”), ‘60s-scented bubblegum (“Bimbo’s Theme”) and Cramps-style ghoul rock (“Hold Me Tight”) with leering glee. Throughout, King Khan & BBQ radiate a sort of perverse innocence — these guys thrash and yelp their way through their tunes with the sincerity of hyperactive eight year-olds. This steaming mess of an album is evidence that rock can never be too simple, too stupid, or too much fun.

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