17 Songs, 1 Hour 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time of their fourth album, 1984’s Ocean Rain, Echo and the Bunnymen had begrudgingly accepted that they were part of a musical wave that might never achieve mainstream UK and US acceptance. Their blend of retro-60s psychedelic pop and ‘80s new wave aggression fared far better in England where the group’s distinct Englishness was easier to assimilate in an era when the U.S. was celebrating the heartland rock of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen. But that didn’t stop the group from trying to make the most challenging and accessible music of its career. The band advertised Ocean Rain as “the greatest album ever made.” While that’s a serious bit of overhype, the album does contain several group highlights. The otherworldly shimmer and singer Ian McCulloch’s British Jim Morrison come-on for “The Killing Moon” makes it a serious candidate for the band’s finest track. “Silver” and “Nocturnal Me” explore the moody temperament that made the band natural favorites among emotionally high-strung adolescents. The deluxe edition contains a generous helping of tracks recorded for the Life at Brian’s television show, including a straight-forward cover of the Beatles’ “All You Need is Love.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time of their fourth album, 1984’s Ocean Rain, Echo and the Bunnymen had begrudgingly accepted that they were part of a musical wave that might never achieve mainstream UK and US acceptance. Their blend of retro-60s psychedelic pop and ‘80s new wave aggression fared far better in England where the group’s distinct Englishness was easier to assimilate in an era when the U.S. was celebrating the heartland rock of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen. But that didn’t stop the group from trying to make the most challenging and accessible music of its career. The band advertised Ocean Rain as “the greatest album ever made.” While that’s a serious bit of overhype, the album does contain several group highlights. The otherworldly shimmer and singer Ian McCulloch’s British Jim Morrison come-on for “The Killing Moon” makes it a serious candidate for the band’s finest track. “Silver” and “Nocturnal Me” explore the moody temperament that made the band natural favorites among emotionally high-strung adolescents. The deluxe edition contains a generous helping of tracks recorded for the Life at Brian’s television show, including a straight-forward cover of the Beatles’ “All You Need is Love.”

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
60 Ratings

60 Ratings

Speak ,

The Best Album of the 1980's

Perfect, lush strings, superb production, strange lyrics, epic arrangments - this album was advertised as the "Greatest Album Ever Made" and that claim isn't absurd by the time you reach My Kingdom, and begins to sound like a totally legit claim by the end of Ocean Rain. When Ian begins howling "Screaming from beneath the waves" you realize that this album is truly a contender for the title, "Greatest album ever made". Essential.

Comradebot ,

The "Greatest Album of All-time"

Famous declaration by Ian McCullough. And while that may or may not be true, one this is for certain:

Ocean Rain is simply amazing.

From the joyful tunes of "Silver" and "Seven Seas" to the epic "The Killing Moon" and the psychedelic "Thorn of Crowns" this albums constantly shows the genius in every aspect of the Bunnymen. Great album, and the bonus tracks are even great. The Echo and Bunnymen cover of The Beatles "All You Need is Love" is one of the few Beatles covers to do the original band justice, and the alternate versions of "Stars Are Stars" and "Villiers Terrace" from their "Crocodiles" album are far different and just as good as the originals.

HIGHLY recommend that you buy the whole album, but the best songs on it are:
"The Killing Moon" (Possibly the Bunnymen's best. Truly amazing.)
"Nocturnal Me"
"Thorn of Crowns"
"Ocean Rain"
"Silver"

And I'm honestly tempted to list every song. Buy it. Hear it. Love it.

Lucky Park Avenue ,

One of the 80's must-have albums!

Ocean Rain is haunting, atmospheric, and seductive. It is music you can get lost in and some of the best that emerged from the 1980s. I saw Echo and the Bunnymen in concert in a "hole-in-the-wall" club in Dublin Ireland in 1984 where they played this entire album. It was hands down the most powerful, absorbing concert I've ever attended (Kitaro is the only exception, but that's a different genre). All of my senses were captivated and time truly felt suspended - all was music. Beautiful!

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