17 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Don’t Forget ’Em,” Consequence reminds himself of the community he left when joining the rap game as a protégé of, first, A Tribe Called Quest and more recently Kanye West. But Don’t Quit Your Day Job, his first official solo album, is framed by details of bad bosses and unfulfilling work as vivid as Ghostface’s coke-life stores. Even without the retail gig, he’s got plenty under his skin: an untrustworthy family member (“Uncle Rahiem”), a chick with a bad perm with whom he left it on bad terms (the loquacious-and-then-some Kanye duet “The Good, the Bad, the Ugly”) and various non-believers in his hip-hop dream (“Night Night”). In between tension-filled episodes, he also manages a knockoff of Marvin Gaye’s “You Sure Love to Ball” for “Pretty Little Sexy Mama.” Day Job nicely walks the line between commercial rap and the underground scene without losing its own sense of cool.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“Don’t Forget ’Em,” Consequence reminds himself of the community he left when joining the rap game as a protégé of, first, A Tribe Called Quest and more recently Kanye West. But Don’t Quit Your Day Job, his first official solo album, is framed by details of bad bosses and unfulfilling work as vivid as Ghostface’s coke-life stores. Even without the retail gig, he’s got plenty under his skin: an untrustworthy family member (“Uncle Rahiem”), a chick with a bad perm with whom he left it on bad terms (the loquacious-and-then-some Kanye duet “The Good, the Bad, the Ugly”) and various non-believers in his hip-hop dream (“Night Night”). In between tension-filled episodes, he also manages a knockoff of Marvin Gaye’s “You Sure Love to Ball” for “Pretty Little Sexy Mama.” Day Job nicely walks the line between commercial rap and the underground scene without losing its own sense of cool.

TITLE TIME
17

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