13 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The sophomore slump may be a killer for musicians who’ve had a hit, but the third time out shows what they’re made of. After the spectacular success of Sheryl Crow’s first two platinum-selling releases, The Globe Sessions showcases a less radio-friendly but more musically mature sound: introspective and bluesy, with rawer, heavier guitars and some of the most emotional and nuanced singing of Crow’s career. “My Favorite Mistake,” the radio hit, sets a heartsick blue-eyed soul shuffle over lush Hammond B3 organ; “There Goes the Neighborhood” kicks off with discofied handclaps before morphing into a late-Stones rocker, complete with sultry alto sax. “Am I Getting Through” is a downbeat, vaguely psychedelic ballad before it goes literally off the hook, a hung-up, beeping phone signaling the song’s transition to jittery, over-caffeinated hard rock. Add in the giddy power-chord chorus of “Anything But Down,” the lovely, brooding, and Celtic-flavored “Riverwide,” and “Mississippi,” a well-chosen Dylan cover, and it’s clear Crow’s willingness to experiment can pay off. The unquestioned highlight here, though, is “The Difficult Kind,” one of the all-time great break-up ballads, spiked with both bitter remorse and the knowledge that remorse makes no difference in the end: “There ain’t nothing like regret/ To remind you you’re alive.” The Globe Sessions is the sound of an artist making music for herself, unafraid to show her vulnerability or her strengths.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The sophomore slump may be a killer for musicians who’ve had a hit, but the third time out shows what they’re made of. After the spectacular success of Sheryl Crow’s first two platinum-selling releases, The Globe Sessions showcases a less radio-friendly but more musically mature sound: introspective and bluesy, with rawer, heavier guitars and some of the most emotional and nuanced singing of Crow’s career. “My Favorite Mistake,” the radio hit, sets a heartsick blue-eyed soul shuffle over lush Hammond B3 organ; “There Goes the Neighborhood” kicks off with discofied handclaps before morphing into a late-Stones rocker, complete with sultry alto sax. “Am I Getting Through” is a downbeat, vaguely psychedelic ballad before it goes literally off the hook, a hung-up, beeping phone signaling the song’s transition to jittery, over-caffeinated hard rock. Add in the giddy power-chord chorus of “Anything But Down,” the lovely, brooding, and Celtic-flavored “Riverwide,” and “Mississippi,” a well-chosen Dylan cover, and it’s clear Crow’s willingness to experiment can pay off. The unquestioned highlight here, though, is “The Difficult Kind,” one of the all-time great break-up ballads, spiked with both bitter remorse and the knowledge that remorse makes no difference in the end: “There ain’t nothing like regret/ To remind you you’re alive.” The Globe Sessions is the sound of an artist making music for herself, unafraid to show her vulnerability or her strengths.

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