14 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Song titles like “The Ghost Who Walks,” “The Truth Is In the Dirt,” and “The Birds They Circle” point to the dark themes that singer/songwriter Karen Elson explores on her 2010 debut. Elson, who is married to Jack White of the Whites Stripes (he served as producer and drummer here), has created an album with a rootsy vibe that, despite the lyrics, isn’t always gloomy. The music has a retro sound that mixes Americana, ‘60s rock, and pop, with keyboards and sliding guitar tones coloring the effective arrangements. Oom-pah rhythms and a piano that reeks of a dank saloon serve as accompaniment on “100 Years from Now,” where Elson slyly sings and talks about a love that won’t matter one day. Spooky guitar tones, accordion bursts, and drums that build and pull back mark “Garden,” a track that finds the model-turned-singer letting loose. “A Thief At My Door” impresses with its sense of restrained drama; it’s a lovely song, and Elson’s voice is imbued with a subtle emotional power. The album closes with “Mouths to Feed,” a dust-bowl tale graced by distinctive fiddle.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Song titles like “The Ghost Who Walks,” “The Truth Is In the Dirt,” and “The Birds They Circle” point to the dark themes that singer/songwriter Karen Elson explores on her 2010 debut. Elson, who is married to Jack White of the Whites Stripes (he served as producer and drummer here), has created an album with a rootsy vibe that, despite the lyrics, isn’t always gloomy. The music has a retro sound that mixes Americana, ‘60s rock, and pop, with keyboards and sliding guitar tones coloring the effective arrangements. Oom-pah rhythms and a piano that reeks of a dank saloon serve as accompaniment on “100 Years from Now,” where Elson slyly sings and talks about a love that won’t matter one day. Spooky guitar tones, accordion bursts, and drums that build and pull back mark “Garden,” a track that finds the model-turned-singer letting loose. “A Thief At My Door” impresses with its sense of restrained drama; it’s a lovely song, and Elson’s voice is imbued with a subtle emotional power. The album closes with “Mouths to Feed,” a dust-bowl tale graced by distinctive fiddle.

TITLE TIME
14

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