10 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a good chance that the Austin psychedelic band Rubble was named after the Bam Caruso compilations of '60s freakbeat. This is how these guys describe their brand of psych: “We don't mean tepid jangle psychedelia from kids whose roots go all the way back to buying a Pebbles box set in 2006: this is the hard stuff made by grown men who know better and can't help themselves.” “Cigarette Rabbit” opens with stormy guitar feedback and plodding drums, then recalls The Creation’s Eddie Phillips' penchant for taking a violin bow to his guitar strings. The driving “It’s So Easy” moves with propulsive rhythms and vocals so distorted and warped it sounds like they were tracked in one of Stephen Hawking’s wormholes. The cool thing about these recordings is that even though they’re influenced by music’s lysergic past, they don’t resort to total retro rehash. Check out “You Can’t Ever Come Down,” where the only period-correct tone comes from a fuzzed-out lead; the rest of the song sounds like it could have been played by Wipers fans in Portland.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a good chance that the Austin psychedelic band Rubble was named after the Bam Caruso compilations of '60s freakbeat. This is how these guys describe their brand of psych: “We don't mean tepid jangle psychedelia from kids whose roots go all the way back to buying a Pebbles box set in 2006: this is the hard stuff made by grown men who know better and can't help themselves.” “Cigarette Rabbit” opens with stormy guitar feedback and plodding drums, then recalls The Creation’s Eddie Phillips' penchant for taking a violin bow to his guitar strings. The driving “It’s So Easy” moves with propulsive rhythms and vocals so distorted and warped it sounds like they were tracked in one of Stephen Hawking’s wormholes. The cool thing about these recordings is that even though they’re influenced by music’s lysergic past, they don’t resort to total retro rehash. Check out “You Can’t Ever Come Down,” where the only period-correct tone comes from a fuzzed-out lead; the rest of the song sounds like it could have been played by Wipers fans in Portland.

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