10 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jimmer is Jimmer Podrasky, who has released his first solo album 23 years after his last album with the Los Angeles–based The Rave-Ups. Those blessed with a good memory (or who've recently seen John Hughes’ Sixteen Candles) may remember Molly Ringwald scrawling the band’s name on her notebook. The Rave-Ups were victims of a record industry never able to effectively market roots-rock bands back in the '80s. Despite the glowing reviews, Jimmer and band moved on. Years later, a Facebook reconnection with his childhood pal Ed Sikov led to Sikov executive-producing The Would-Be Plans, and musicians such as drummer Mitch Marine (Smash Mouth, Dwight Yoakam), organist Rami Jaffee (Wallflowers), and pedal-steel man Marty Rifkin (Bruce Springsteen) contributed to this 10-song-strong collection, which shows that Jimmer’s music only sounds better with age and superior production. The guitars crunch mean and nasty on the title track, and the Tom Petty–like opening burst of harmonica and folk-rock guitars on “The Far Left Side of You” signal that Jimmer is back doing what he should’ve been doing all along.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jimmer is Jimmer Podrasky, who has released his first solo album 23 years after his last album with the Los Angeles–based The Rave-Ups. Those blessed with a good memory (or who've recently seen John Hughes’ Sixteen Candles) may remember Molly Ringwald scrawling the band’s name on her notebook. The Rave-Ups were victims of a record industry never able to effectively market roots-rock bands back in the '80s. Despite the glowing reviews, Jimmer and band moved on. Years later, a Facebook reconnection with his childhood pal Ed Sikov led to Sikov executive-producing The Would-Be Plans, and musicians such as drummer Mitch Marine (Smash Mouth, Dwight Yoakam), organist Rami Jaffee (Wallflowers), and pedal-steel man Marty Rifkin (Bruce Springsteen) contributed to this 10-song-strong collection, which shows that Jimmer’s music only sounds better with age and superior production. The guitars crunch mean and nasty on the title track, and the Tom Petty–like opening burst of harmonica and folk-rock guitars on “The Far Left Side of You” signal that Jimmer is back doing what he should’ve been doing all along.

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