9 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This will go down in history as the final studio album by an artist who transcended genre and shook the foundations of music several times with a catalog that's unsurpassed. Davis was always one to move ahead of (or at least sidestep) expectations. This 1992 album finds him and producer Easy Mo Bee mining the hip-hop/jazz fusion of A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Arrested Development, and Digable Planets, a style that was au courant at the time. Even though the producer went on to work with Candy Dulfer, Big Daddy Kane, 2Pac, Alicia Keys, and LL Cool J, hip-hop and jazz critics alike were hoping for more from this collaboration; the beats and arrangements were pretty straightforward. Nonetheless, this sounds right in line with subsequent DJ efforts like the Verve Remixed and Buddha-Bar collections, proving that Miles was on point all the way to the end and beyond. Davis himself sounds engaged, which is saying something. Highlights include “Mystery,” “The Doo Bop Song,” and “Chocolate Chip.”

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

This will go down in history as the final studio album by an artist who transcended genre and shook the foundations of music several times with a catalog that's unsurpassed. Davis was always one to move ahead of (or at least sidestep) expectations. This 1992 album finds him and producer Easy Mo Bee mining the hip-hop/jazz fusion of A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Arrested Development, and Digable Planets, a style that was au courant at the time. Even though the producer went on to work with Candy Dulfer, Big Daddy Kane, 2Pac, Alicia Keys, and LL Cool J, hip-hop and jazz critics alike were hoping for more from this collaboration; the beats and arrangements were pretty straightforward. Nonetheless, this sounds right in line with subsequent DJ efforts like the Verve Remixed and Buddha-Bar collections, proving that Miles was on point all the way to the end and beyond. Davis himself sounds engaged, which is saying something. Highlights include “Mystery,” “The Doo Bop Song,” and “Chocolate Chip.”

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

$tnee$ ,

Teenibop

My dad was and is a die hard jazz fan. He played all of Miles albums day and night, including Doo Bop. Pocketed this CD when I left for college and loved it ever since. 😍😍

Keaggy_Head ,

Mystery Alone

I agree with the other reviewer that Mystery alone is worth listening for. Some of Miles’s 80’s playing was disjointed a bit rambling with a few cracked notes, but this piece was incredible. Miles playing is almost sensual and very succinct. Every note feels right and uses the space well. As to other tracks Duke Booty, fantasy, Mystery Reprise. Even the rap tracks aren’t half bad. People complain because they say isn’t jazz, which it isn’t, but you have to remember the context. Miles changed his dress sin the 70’s and incorporated electronic instruments and rock to be culturally relevant when he saw the influence of Sly the family stone and Jimi Hendrix. So to incorporate rap was to follow where people where going culturally. Hopefully he wouldn’t have been sucked into the 90’s “f that hoe mother find… etc” although he was just as vulgar as the rappers.

Andy54321a ,

Five stars for Mystery

One of my all time favorite down tempo tunes. Is this old school jazz - no, but it was way avantgarde in regards to chill down tempo with the upgrade of some of Miles trumpet insertions .

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