22 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hollywood legend John Williams received his record 49th Academy Award® nomination for this quiet, introspective score to Brian Percival’s adaptation of Australian author Markus Zusak’s bittersweet WW2 fable. Working as he always has—“with a piano and a pencil,” Williams muses—the composer conjured a score dominated by elegant writing for piano, “because it seemed singular. It seemed personal and private.” But he’s quick to note it’s actually “two pianos sounding as one, something I’d never done before. Playing together, tracing each other, producing a sort of reverberance.” The choice mirrors what Williams calls the film’s double track. "We see this little girl who’s unable to read or write, and what she shows us is that one can achieve solace and immortality through letters: the word, writing. The other track is the providential voice of Death, who seems to be a very embracing and warm person.” He admits he was seduced by “the idea of the solace that can be found in literature, something similar to what we as musicians feel we find in music. And music can be a lifetime obsession that's also a lifesaver, in the way that her life was saved by her passion for books.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Hollywood legend John Williams received his record 49th Academy Award® nomination for this quiet, introspective score to Brian Percival’s adaptation of Australian author Markus Zusak’s bittersweet WW2 fable. Working as he always has—“with a piano and a pencil,” Williams muses—the composer conjured a score dominated by elegant writing for piano, “because it seemed singular. It seemed personal and private.” But he’s quick to note it’s actually “two pianos sounding as one, something I’d never done before. Playing together, tracing each other, producing a sort of reverberance.” The choice mirrors what Williams calls the film’s double track. "We see this little girl who’s unable to read or write, and what she shows us is that one can achieve solace and immortality through letters: the word, writing. The other track is the providential voice of Death, who seems to be a very embracing and warm person.” He admits he was seduced by “the idea of the solace that can be found in literature, something similar to what we as musicians feel we find in music. And music can be a lifetime obsession that's also a lifesaver, in the way that her life was saved by her passion for books.”

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
41 Ratings

41 Ratings

keh1016 ,

Heartwarming!

A reminisce of what scores used to sound like and what they used to be. When I listen to this score I hear the first two years of Harry Potter and Angela's Ashes, which are my favorites of this artist. So Williams outdid himself with this one! Five stars all the way! I ask myself why haven't I heard more like this recently? It is heart warming and John Williams is at his best. I haven't seen the movie yet but I'm sure hearing this score, did it justice.Great score!

Tolkien lover ,

A must have

John Williams has done it again! This is a must have soundtrack. The movie was pretty good, the book was SUPERB, and the soundtrack is amazing. Whether or not it fit the movie, on its own, it's magnificent. Buy the whole album, trust me, you WILL NOT regret it.

ostmusiclover ,

Great Piano Work!

This has a lot of piano in it woven with other instruments as only John Williams can. Great score! :-)

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