13 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released in 1961 — just one year after his life was cut short in a collision with a drunk driver — this is the original collection of Johnny Horton’s most famous songs, and it has stood the test of time. Horton amassed an impressive body of work over the course of his abbreviated career, but his biggest song was “The Battle of New Orleans.” The song won the 1960 GRAMMY for Best Country & Western Recording, and inspired Horton to record several other historically and geographically themed songs, including “North to Alaska,” “Johnny Reb,” “When It’s Springtime In Alaska (It’s Forty Below),” “Sink the Bismarck,” “Comanche (The Brave Horse),” “Jim Bridger” and “Johnny Freedom,” all of which are included here. Horton’s interpretations of pioneers and soldiers are still beloved today, but if not for the success of “Battle of New Orleans,” he could have easily made legend as an introspective folk singer. “Whispering Pines,” “The Mansion You Stole” and “All for the Love of a Girl” formulate a unique brand of ethereal, lonesome country music that anticipates the work of ‘60s folksingers like Fred Neil and Tim Hardin.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released in 1961 — just one year after his life was cut short in a collision with a drunk driver — this is the original collection of Johnny Horton’s most famous songs, and it has stood the test of time. Horton amassed an impressive body of work over the course of his abbreviated career, but his biggest song was “The Battle of New Orleans.” The song won the 1960 GRAMMY for Best Country & Western Recording, and inspired Horton to record several other historically and geographically themed songs, including “North to Alaska,” “Johnny Reb,” “When It’s Springtime In Alaska (It’s Forty Below),” “Sink the Bismarck,” “Comanche (The Brave Horse),” “Jim Bridger” and “Johnny Freedom,” all of which are included here. Horton’s interpretations of pioneers and soldiers are still beloved today, but if not for the success of “Battle of New Orleans,” he could have easily made legend as an introspective folk singer. “Whispering Pines,” “The Mansion You Stole” and “All for the Love of a Girl” formulate a unique brand of ethereal, lonesome country music that anticipates the work of ‘60s folksingers like Fred Neil and Tim Hardin.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
91 Ratings

91 Ratings

Sword Of Damocles ,

country music

This is what country music is supposed to sound like, Grew up listening to North To Alaska, The Battle Of N.O. Sink the Bismark, All tune are solid Well worth the investment.

steve portacan ,

Johnny Horton's Greatest Hits

Get both Alaska songs, Sink the Bismarck, Jim Bridger and Battle of New Orleans, a pitcher of beer and a couple of friends who know good music, and its the most fun you can have learning history. Itunes -- Get The World of Johhny Horton -- a double album that includes Young Abe Lincoln, which is missing in this collection.

RandLinc ,

Give me a Break?

The ignorance of some reviewers should be forgiven. Johnny Horton should not be confused with the racist music of Johnny Rebel aka Clifford Joseph Trahan. Horton had a classic song Johnny Reb but should be confused. Ignorance is never an excuse.

Wonderful songs each worth given a listen.
Great singer who died much too soon. Thank you Johnny Horton. Your wonderful style and voice are truely missed in this world today.

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