7 Songs, 21 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

North Carolina singer-songwriter Chase Rice spent the first decade of his writing and recording career trying to steer toward the stylistic tailwind in the country format. Like many of his male peers, he’s gradually evolved from swaggering party jams to a comparatively mellower and more earnest approach, leading up to his most deliberately crafted release to date. During “Everywhere,” Rice broods over a lost love with conversational sung-spoken verses, while “Messy” opens with minimalism—just a delicate electric guitar figure and his hushed, supplicating vocals—and builds to an insistent cadence. During “Best Night Ever,” one of several songs he co-wrote, he drifts from murmured, pop-smoothed rumination to emo-style ardor bolstered by a sleek wall of sound, and during the mostly acoustic “Forever to Go,” he ponders the past and future of a pairing with contented warmth.

EDITORS’ NOTES

North Carolina singer-songwriter Chase Rice spent the first decade of his writing and recording career trying to steer toward the stylistic tailwind in the country format. Like many of his male peers, he’s gradually evolved from swaggering party jams to a comparatively mellower and more earnest approach, leading up to his most deliberately crafted release to date. During “Everywhere,” Rice broods over a lost love with conversational sung-spoken verses, while “Messy” opens with minimalism—just a delicate electric guitar figure and his hushed, supplicating vocals—and builds to an insistent cadence. During “Best Night Ever,” one of several songs he co-wrote, he drifts from murmured, pop-smoothed rumination to emo-style ardor bolstered by a sleek wall of sound, and during the mostly acoustic “Forever to Go,” he ponders the past and future of a pairing with contented warmth.

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