12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Beneath the lurching rhythms and cryptic lyrics, Protomartyr’s take on post-punk has always been more bar band than art school, the work of four Midwestern guys slugging it out in a dim corner at the edge of the world. Their ambitious third album strikes a balance between driving melodicism (“Dope Cloud,” “The Devil in His Youth”) and strange yet searing nocturnes (“Boice or Boyce,” “Why Does it Shake?”) that stretch out toward mysterious conclusions. Half the time, singer Joe Casey sounds like he stumbled into the frame by accident, making his romantic turns (“Ellen”) that much more arresting.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Beneath the lurching rhythms and cryptic lyrics, Protomartyr’s take on post-punk has always been more bar band than art school, the work of four Midwestern guys slugging it out in a dim corner at the edge of the world. Their ambitious third album strikes a balance between driving melodicism (“Dope Cloud,” “The Devil in His Youth”) and strange yet searing nocturnes (“Boice or Boyce,” “Why Does it Shake?”) that stretch out toward mysterious conclusions. Half the time, singer Joe Casey sounds like he stumbled into the frame by accident, making his romantic turns (“Ellen”) that much more arresting.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

Satanovskizzer ,

A True Masterpiece

While I will outright admit that this album (and Protomartyr) is not for everyone, for those that can and do appreciate it nothing else quite compares. The lyrics are somewhere between early 20th century classic literature and postmodern philosophical manifesto. The musicality, to me, takes a back seat to the lyrics (simply because their lyrics are literally unmatched), but it's still very jammable. The guitars and drums are intense, and in many songs the instrumentation builds into an evocative cacophony of absolute emotion and brutal catharsis.

But really, just listen to the words, read along with them, really think about what's being said. The concepts being explored in this album are extraordinarily profound.

Shcmittywerbermanjensen ,

Interesting

A lot of the guitar work is a mix with dissonant and sharp chords like The Jesus Lizard, as well as the vocals. But the sporadic melodic parts that pop up just make it awesome.

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