14 Songs, 1 Hour 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since Eric Clapton’s ‘60s and ‘70s output has been exhaustively documented, Clapton Chronicles offers a new perspective on his career, focusing solely on the years between 1983 and 1999. While he could have easily retired in the late ‘70s and coasted along on the basis of his reputation, Clapton used the ‘80s to renew himself as a pop singer and songwriter. “Pretending,” “Bad Love” and “It’s In the Way That You Use It” made him relevant to a generation weaned on the Police and Huey Lewis, and his career reached even higher plateaus in the ‘90s. “Change the World” and “My Father’s Eyes,” crossover songs that appealed to fans of pop, R&B and rock alike, were his biggest hits. Meanwhile, “Tears In Heaven” became a modern standard, and remains one of the most emotionally fragile songs to ever become a #1 hit. Even as Clapton entered middle age he refused to rest on his laurels. For all the radical renditions Clapton has recorded in his career — from “Crossroads” to “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door”— no could have predicted his 1992 re-envisioning of “Layla” as a work of understated and effortlessly groovy acoustic blues.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since Eric Clapton’s ‘60s and ‘70s output has been exhaustively documented, Clapton Chronicles offers a new perspective on his career, focusing solely on the years between 1983 and 1999. While he could have easily retired in the late ‘70s and coasted along on the basis of his reputation, Clapton used the ‘80s to renew himself as a pop singer and songwriter. “Pretending,” “Bad Love” and “It’s In the Way That You Use It” made him relevant to a generation weaned on the Police and Huey Lewis, and his career reached even higher plateaus in the ‘90s. “Change the World” and “My Father’s Eyes,” crossover songs that appealed to fans of pop, R&B and rock alike, were his biggest hits. Meanwhile, “Tears In Heaven” became a modern standard, and remains one of the most emotionally fragile songs to ever become a #1 hit. Even as Clapton entered middle age he refused to rest on his laurels. For all the radical renditions Clapton has recorded in his career — from “Crossroads” to “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door”— no could have predicted his 1992 re-envisioning of “Layla” as a work of understated and effortlessly groovy acoustic blues.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
43 Ratings

43 Ratings

poqtown2010 ,

Eric Clapton: Greatest Hits? A surefire sucess

What more can be said? The title of this album is quite true: it is a chronicle of Clapton's greatness. The only thing that would make it better would be some more from his blues-like (album example: From the Cradle), and possibly some of his work with Derek and the Dominoes( The fast Layla and Bell Bottom Blues, along with others, spring to mind.) Either way, excellent album

SusanBTW ,

Great Album

The album is true to his traditional work. A few new songs I hadn't heard, which was a nice surprise.

Rodrigomonge cr ,

Amazing

Amazing work!! No skip song Cd!!

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