13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Scissor Sisters are reminiscent of so many different bands (and eras) that part of the fun is playing name that influence. There’s Abba and the Bee Gees for sure (lead singer Jake Shears has one sweet falsetto), a touch of Elton John’s gift for melody (and there’s good reason for it: John co-wrote the album’s irresistible opener “Don’t Feel Like Dancin’”), boy/girl harmonies like the B-52s, and a heap of New York disco and glam attitude. And that’s no put-down. These Sisters (and brothers) write catchy pop songs that actually have a shelf life, and they sound good both in a club and on the radio, no small feat. At first blush they might seem a guilty pleasure, except there’s nothing to feel guilty about — the music is loads of fun without being inane, unapologetically retro, and the lyrics are mostly interesting and funny rather than irrelevant, as is so often the case with polished pop. This is undoubtedly music to shake your stuff to, but Ta-Dah, their second release, contains more than dance floor workouts. On slower numbers such as the ballad “Land of a Thousand Words” and the swirling “Transistor,” they aim for mood as much as groove and achieve both nicely. Prepare to release your inner boogie.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Scissor Sisters are reminiscent of so many different bands (and eras) that part of the fun is playing name that influence. There’s Abba and the Bee Gees for sure (lead singer Jake Shears has one sweet falsetto), a touch of Elton John’s gift for melody (and there’s good reason for it: John co-wrote the album’s irresistible opener “Don’t Feel Like Dancin’”), boy/girl harmonies like the B-52s, and a heap of New York disco and glam attitude. And that’s no put-down. These Sisters (and brothers) write catchy pop songs that actually have a shelf life, and they sound good both in a club and on the radio, no small feat. At first blush they might seem a guilty pleasure, except there’s nothing to feel guilty about — the music is loads of fun without being inane, unapologetically retro, and the lyrics are mostly interesting and funny rather than irrelevant, as is so often the case with polished pop. This is undoubtedly music to shake your stuff to, but Ta-Dah, their second release, contains more than dance floor workouts. On slower numbers such as the ballad “Land of a Thousand Words” and the swirling “Transistor,” they aim for mood as much as groove and achieve both nicely. Prepare to release your inner boogie.

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