9 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Matias Aguayo’s work has an international flair befitting his own biography—Chilean roots, German upbringing, globe-trotting DJ career. Support Alien Invasion, his first album since 2013’s The Visitor, makes explicit his disregard for borders and systems of control; ironically, it is also his first solo album that makes no use of his own voice. Instead of his usual beatboxing and vocal sampling, Aguayo focuses his energies on polyrhythmic drum programming, coming up with some of the most devilishly intricate rhythms of his entire catalog. There’s no missing the album’s political subtext, though. His drums are unmistakably African in their origin, while his synths—the cascading rave stabs of “2019,” the Hollywood blockbuster string vamps of the title track—blare like emergency sirens. It’s not easy to turn crisis into dance music, but Aguayo succeeds, inviting us to sweat out our anguish and dance our way to a better world.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Matias Aguayo’s work has an international flair befitting his own biography—Chilean roots, German upbringing, globe-trotting DJ career. Support Alien Invasion, his first album since 2013’s The Visitor, makes explicit his disregard for borders and systems of control; ironically, it is also his first solo album that makes no use of his own voice. Instead of his usual beatboxing and vocal sampling, Aguayo focuses his energies on polyrhythmic drum programming, coming up with some of the most devilishly intricate rhythms of his entire catalog. There’s no missing the album’s political subtext, though. His drums are unmistakably African in their origin, while his synths—the cascading rave stabs of “2019,” the Hollywood blockbuster string vamps of the title track—blare like emergency sirens. It’s not easy to turn crisis into dance music, but Aguayo succeeds, inviting us to sweat out our anguish and dance our way to a better world.

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