18 Songs, 1 Hour 19 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Richard Strauss’ two works for cello are undoubted masterpieces. Don Quixote, a set of variations with solo cello at its heart, is one of the truly great concertante works—and one of the most witty. Gaillard draws a wide range of colors and emotions from her instrument in her depiction of the elderly knight’s errant adventures, including his encounter with windmills and battles with sheep—complete with inspired bleating brass. Two beautiful works wrap around Don Quixote: the Cello Sonata, full of poise, passion, and joy; and the orchestral song “Morgen,” sung ravishingly with its original cello and orchestra accompaniment.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Richard Strauss’ two works for cello are undoubted masterpieces. Don Quixote, a set of variations with solo cello at its heart, is one of the truly great concertante works—and one of the most witty. Gaillard draws a wide range of colors and emotions from her instrument in her depiction of the elderly knight’s errant adventures, including his encounter with windmills and battles with sheep—complete with inspired bleating brass. Two beautiful works wrap around Don Quixote: the Cello Sonata, full of poise, passion, and joy; and the orchestral song “Morgen,” sung ravishingly with its original cello and orchestra accompaniment.

TITLE TIME

More By Ophélie Gaillard