8 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Martin Kohlstedt’s albums are often intimate, personal works of art. However, on Ströme, the German pianist/composer widens his focus and invites one of his country’s most renowned choral groups, Leipzig’s GewandhausChor, to abandon their scores and improvise with him. The wordless voices often add deep resonance to his rich musical tapestries, as in “NIODOM.” Elsewhere, he allows them to soar free—in the joyful, folk-inspired “TARLEH” and the swirling “THIPHY,” where voices and electronic effects intermingle. In the final track, “AMSOMB,” Kohlstedt harnesses the rich sounds of full orchestra, choir, and synths to mesmerizing effect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Martin Kohlstedt’s albums are often intimate, personal works of art. However, on Ströme, the German pianist/composer widens his focus and invites one of his country’s most renowned choral groups, Leipzig’s GewandhausChor, to abandon their scores and improvise with him. The wordless voices often add deep resonance to his rich musical tapestries, as in “NIODOM.” Elsewhere, he allows them to soar free—in the joyful, folk-inspired “TARLEH” and the swirling “THIPHY,” where voices and electronic effects intermingle. In the final track, “AMSOMB,” Kohlstedt harnesses the rich sounds of full orchestra, choir, and synths to mesmerizing effect.

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