17 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

The collaboration between Seattle beat maker Jake One and Philly rapper Freeway is definitive of a new creative model for rap music: one producer from one part of the country links with a rapper from another part of the country in the service of a lean, focused album with a minimum of guests and gimmicks. The Stimulus Package is clearly meant to echo the fundamentalist values of old-school hip-hop culture without resorting to nostalgia or imitation. The songs are well crafted and straightforward, laced with vintage soul samples that don’t mimic the 2001-era old-style of Kanye West, but rather seem to conjure the voices from an earlier generation of hardworking black voices. This effect is best experienced on “Money,” in which Freeway recounts a lifetime of hustles — from sweeping hair in the barbershop to “sellin’ incense and oils to all the people there”— over a mournful sample from 24 Carat Black’s 1973 song “Poverty’s Paradise.” Freeway’s final verse from the same song epitomizes the album’s ethos.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The collaboration between Seattle beat maker Jake One and Philly rapper Freeway is definitive of a new creative model for rap music: one producer from one part of the country links with a rapper from another part of the country in the service of a lean, focused album with a minimum of guests and gimmicks. The Stimulus Package is clearly meant to echo the fundamentalist values of old-school hip-hop culture without resorting to nostalgia or imitation. The songs are well crafted and straightforward, laced with vintage soul samples that don’t mimic the 2001-era old-style of Kanye West, but rather seem to conjure the voices from an earlier generation of hardworking black voices. This effect is best experienced on “Money,” in which Freeway recounts a lifetime of hustles — from sweeping hair in the barbershop to “sellin’ incense and oils to all the people there”— over a mournful sample from 24 Carat Black’s 1973 song “Poverty’s Paradise.” Freeway’s final verse from the same song epitomizes the album’s ethos.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
160 Ratings

160 Ratings

D Her ,

Great CD

This one one of the best cd's to come out. Finally some real music and not all that Poo the industry pushes 24/7. This CD is a must have.. Check out the physical CD the packaging is so awsome

ORESTES9 ,

Best Hip Hop album of 2010 so far!

Forget everything you know or have listened to by Freeway. When he ryhmes over soulful beats like this...the man truly shines. Hip Hop needs more albums like this...where you have an artist and a producer that just complement each other so well. I can put this on from start to finish...the album is a classic. Buy it or you will regret it. If you can... cop the physical cd...not only is the album packaging dope but it also comes with a code to d'load the instrumentals.

ChaseTheDon ,

SICK

This Album is nuts start to finish no weak tracks, which is rare in todays hip-hop. Support real music and then labels will be forced to push talented artists

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