19 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

KRS-One had remained a hip-hop leader through several generations of new talent and had proven himself as an artist in a multitude of different ways. Knowing that he'd earned the permanent attention of his peers, he started challenging them anew. I Got Next includes a live spoken-word lecture (“2nd Quarter—Free Throws”), a crawling, near-tipsy piece of jazz poetry (“Over Ya Head”), and a blistering exercise in alternative metal (“Just to Prove a Point”). In that last song, when KRS says he’s “not the type to listen to what everybody will say, but more and more it’s seeming that I can’t trust you anyway,” one gets the feeling that he's referring to an audience whose complacency he's come to resent. Of course, the second golden age of New York hip-hop wasn’t quite over, and I Got Next also delivers a slew of jazzy, shadowy, menacing songs that fit easily alongside classics by Nas and The Wu-Tang Clan. Among these are “A Friend” and the stealthy “Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop,” produced by DJ Muggs.

EDITORS’ NOTES

KRS-One had remained a hip-hop leader through several generations of new talent and had proven himself as an artist in a multitude of different ways. Knowing that he'd earned the permanent attention of his peers, he started challenging them anew. I Got Next includes a live spoken-word lecture (“2nd Quarter—Free Throws”), a crawling, near-tipsy piece of jazz poetry (“Over Ya Head”), and a blistering exercise in alternative metal (“Just to Prove a Point”). In that last song, when KRS says he’s “not the type to listen to what everybody will say, but more and more it’s seeming that I can’t trust you anyway,” one gets the feeling that he's referring to an audience whose complacency he's come to resent. Of course, the second golden age of New York hip-hop wasn’t quite over, and I Got Next also delivers a slew of jazzy, shadowy, menacing songs that fit easily alongside classics by Nas and The Wu-Tang Clan. Among these are “A Friend” and the stealthy “Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop,” produced by DJ Muggs.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
45 Ratings

45 Ratings

RJ Lee ,

Classic Blastmaster

Following up Return of The Boom Bap is a tough road to hoe but KRS-One comes back with another gem.
The production is consistent and hard. Head nod music if you will and perfect of KRS's flow. The standout is of course Step Into a World. Easliy one of the most underrated hip hop songs of all time, it captures all the ferocity of the music genre with some of the best braggido and lyrics that arguably the greatest MC ever has mustered. It is a great listen from start to finish with great guest spots from Redman and Angie Martinez.
We also see KRS further defining what Hip Hop is and what it means through his "Quarter" interludes as well as in the lyrics of every song.
A Hip Hop must have.

Da Real JAYSTONE ,

Da Teacher

One of the best krs albums

Oppocups3000 ,

Top 5 Greatest Hip-Hop Album of All Time

Period.

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