19 Songs, 1 Hour 19 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ultimately, the Faces’ legacy is not built on concepts, or even songs, but spirit. The band’s greatness comes from the feeling they brought to the material — the looseness and affection with which they delivered the music. That essence is imparted on Good Boys When They’re Asleep, a best-of compiled by keyboardist Ian McLagan. The collection touches on every stage of the band’s brief, four-album career, and places famous songs (“Stay With Me,” “Ooh la la”) next to overlooked but crucial album tracks (“Bad ‘n’ Ruin,” “Debris,” “Glad and Sorry,” “Borstal Boys”). The collection also makes available a pair of tunes drawn from the band’s final two singles: “Pool Hall Richard” and “You Can Make Me Dance, Sing, or Anything…” both excellent, although the latter song features replacement bassist Tetsu Yamauchi instead of Ronnie Lane. Though the band persisted until 1975, Lane’s 1973 departure effectively ended the Faces, and if there is a downside to Good Boys it’s that it should put a bigger emphasis on Lane’s contributions. Rod Stewart was the band’s mouthpiece and salesman, but Lane, undoubtedly, was its heart.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ultimately, the Faces’ legacy is not built on concepts, or even songs, but spirit. The band’s greatness comes from the feeling they brought to the material — the looseness and affection with which they delivered the music. That essence is imparted on Good Boys When They’re Asleep, a best-of compiled by keyboardist Ian McLagan. The collection touches on every stage of the band’s brief, four-album career, and places famous songs (“Stay With Me,” “Ooh la la”) next to overlooked but crucial album tracks (“Bad ‘n’ Ruin,” “Debris,” “Glad and Sorry,” “Borstal Boys”). The collection also makes available a pair of tunes drawn from the band’s final two singles: “Pool Hall Richard” and “You Can Make Me Dance, Sing, or Anything…” both excellent, although the latter song features replacement bassist Tetsu Yamauchi instead of Ronnie Lane. Though the band persisted until 1975, Lane’s 1973 departure effectively ended the Faces, and if there is a downside to Good Boys it’s that it should put a bigger emphasis on Lane’s contributions. Rod Stewart was the band’s mouthpiece and salesman, but Lane, undoubtedly, was its heart.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
71 Ratings

71 Ratings

Spyness ,

A forgotten group from the good old days

The Faces may have only had one hit song, but there is not a bad song to be found on this disc. Great material and like the iTunes reviewer said, a truly listenable album. We've got Rod Stewart on vocals, where he sounds amazing. Then we have Ron Wood on guitar, with a slightly sloppy style. In my opinion, his playing here is much better then after he joined The Rolling Stones. And finally, we have the three remaining members of The Small Faces, providing the rhythm section and keyboards. All this comes together to form a band that produced class A material, yet was sadly underrated. Buy this disc, and I promise you will not be disappointed.

moneyclip ,

not a bad tune on the album

Rock in it's purest form... Laid down in all it's sloppy messy glory. I'm a huge Black Crowes fan and after listening to this timeless music, I can hear influences in their music...

As a musician this album inspires me.

Death0Glory ,

A Must Listen

Speechless. I wish that i knew about this band when i was younger man, no pun intended, Rod Stewart and the gang at their best (Before he sold out and went solo -_-)

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