11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While modern times have brought together an entire respected “alt-country” scene, the ‘80s had no such organization, but rather a number of bands considered “roots rock” who adhered to certain country and/ or rockabilly stylings. The Long Ryders were among the more successful with their second full-length album State of Our Union remaining, arguably, their strongest release. Beginning with the anthem-like “Looking for Lewis and Clark” and stopping off for the Old-West nostalgia of “Lights of Downtown,” the recalling of ancient radio waves (“Wdia”) and other tributes to times well past (“Here Comes That Train Again,” “You Just Can’t Ride That Train Anymore”), the Long Ryders were determined to ignore the present and create their own world and reality. Just as Goths had their imaginary terrain, the Long Ryders pursued their old world with passion and precision. The guitarplaying and harmonies between Sid Griffin and Stephen McCarthy reflect their long-standing interest in Gram Parsons and keep the country-rock flame alive with the touching “Two Kinds of Love” and the agitated rush of “Capturing the Flag.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

While modern times have brought together an entire respected “alt-country” scene, the ‘80s had no such organization, but rather a number of bands considered “roots rock” who adhered to certain country and/ or rockabilly stylings. The Long Ryders were among the more successful with their second full-length album State of Our Union remaining, arguably, their strongest release. Beginning with the anthem-like “Looking for Lewis and Clark” and stopping off for the Old-West nostalgia of “Lights of Downtown,” the recalling of ancient radio waves (“Wdia”) and other tributes to times well past (“Here Comes That Train Again,” “You Just Can’t Ride That Train Anymore”), the Long Ryders were determined to ignore the present and create their own world and reality. Just as Goths had their imaginary terrain, the Long Ryders pursued their old world with passion and precision. The guitarplaying and harmonies between Sid Griffin and Stephen McCarthy reflect their long-standing interest in Gram Parsons and keep the country-rock flame alive with the touching “Two Kinds of Love” and the agitated rush of “Capturing the Flag.”

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