14 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ride The Blinds’ 2006 sophomore album picks up right where their 2004 eponymous debut left off — rocking out like the house band at a Hell’s Angels party in 1970. The San Francisco trio kickstarts Start Running with “Too True,” a stompy roots-rocker with a twangy Crazy Horse crunch pouring from singer Chris Guthridge’s vintage amp as brothers Bill and Nick Cramer hold down an airtight rhythm section. “Here We Go Again” is a slower smoldering number that builds on walls of Gibson hollow-body guitar distortion and powerful John Bonham-inspired drum-fills. The band downshifts on “Sometimes,” a smoky serenade with closely sung vocal harmonies and a twangy wah-wah effect on the guitar that sounds somewhat similar to Led Zeppelin’s “Tangerine.” Fusing heavy acid-rock with blues riffs, “Lies And Deceit” sounds like Guthridge locked himself in a woodshed for a week with nothing but Cream’s Wheels Of Fire to keep him occupied.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ride The Blinds’ 2006 sophomore album picks up right where their 2004 eponymous debut left off — rocking out like the house band at a Hell’s Angels party in 1970. The San Francisco trio kickstarts Start Running with “Too True,” a stompy roots-rocker with a twangy Crazy Horse crunch pouring from singer Chris Guthridge’s vintage amp as brothers Bill and Nick Cramer hold down an airtight rhythm section. “Here We Go Again” is a slower smoldering number that builds on walls of Gibson hollow-body guitar distortion and powerful John Bonham-inspired drum-fills. The band downshifts on “Sometimes,” a smoky serenade with closely sung vocal harmonies and a twangy wah-wah effect on the guitar that sounds somewhat similar to Led Zeppelin’s “Tangerine.” Fusing heavy acid-rock with blues riffs, “Lies And Deceit” sounds like Guthridge locked himself in a woodshed for a week with nothing but Cream’s Wheels Of Fire to keep him occupied.

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