13 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As louder, harder sounds broke through to the mainstream, Living Colour were encouraged to explore their darker side—a feat not too difficult considering the talents within the band. Bassist Muzz Skillings had parted ways amicably to explore his own musical interests, and the incredibly capable Doug Wimbish (Mick Jagger, Madonna) took his slot. Ron Saint Germain—who’d previously produced Vernon Reid’s favorite band, Bad Brains—ensured a tougher sound here, and the avoidance of guest appearances (which Time’s Up had benefitted from) forced the band to look inward. Living Colour's natural anti-establishment and cynical world views come through loud and clear on “Go Away,” “Ignorance Is Bliss," and “Never Satisfied,” while the low-key but powerful “Nothingness” captures the band’s incredible empathy. “Auslander” and “Postman” bring Wimbish to the battlefront for to-the-point rockers. It’s incredible to think the group disbanded after this—citing musical differences—considering how well everybody works here, as both individuals and members of the team. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

As louder, harder sounds broke through to the mainstream, Living Colour were encouraged to explore their darker side—a feat not too difficult considering the talents within the band. Bassist Muzz Skillings had parted ways amicably to explore his own musical interests, and the incredibly capable Doug Wimbish (Mick Jagger, Madonna) took his slot. Ron Saint Germain—who’d previously produced Vernon Reid’s favorite band, Bad Brains—ensured a tougher sound here, and the avoidance of guest appearances (which Time’s Up had benefitted from) forced the band to look inward. Living Colour's natural anti-establishment and cynical world views come through loud and clear on “Go Away,” “Ignorance Is Bliss," and “Never Satisfied,” while the low-key but powerful “Nothingness” captures the band’s incredible empathy. “Auslander” and “Postman” bring Wimbish to the battlefront for to-the-point rockers. It’s incredible to think the group disbanded after this—citing musical differences—considering how well everybody works here, as both individuals and members of the team. 

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

everknotfailsafe ,

The Darkest Colour

This ebon album plumbs depths of it's characters in a sonic tapestry of dark and darker. "Go Away" a little "ballad" about starvation in Africa starts the album like a punch to the gut, and it only gets more real from there... Doug Wimbish not only steps into the guitars register on this album, but adds a dexterous texture to the underlying melodies. The production is fierce, sounding not unlike a instructional cd on schizophrenia, with the twisting spoken thoughts, broken chains and closing prison (Auslander) doors. Vernon Reid is at his sonic best and swings in anarchistic style with venom and focused energy. This album, may not be the most popular in their discography, but it is the best.

JamesT15 ,

The best.

This record was such a great record. I loved Vivid and Time's Up (which is typically everyone's favorite). But Stain was the giant, IMO . . . my favorite record growing up, indeed. These guys nailed it with this one . . . and can I be so bold as to say that Sony made a mistake in their choice of the first single. "Leave it Alone" was not a good representation of what this record had to offer. It was a conservative selection, and that pretty much buried this dynamic band.

Jasonx ,

a classic

a classic, one of the greatest bands of the 90's

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