10 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Having existed in one form or another for more than 30 years, Laibach have always made music that's deliberately difficult listening. Now they've become “politically engaged as never before,” according to the press materials for 2014’s Spectre. Coming from a collective that have used both fascist and communist ideas (and anything else considered controversial) in their imagery and language, it hardly seems new for Laibach to acknowledge current events of any kind. SPECTRE concerns a global terrorist organization in the world of James Bond, and “The Whistleblowers” is said to allude “to the heroism of the new digital Prometheans of freedom—Bradley Manning, Edward Snowden, Julian Assange.” The music is similarly cold, heavy, and martial. Beats pound, synthesizers signal doom, and triggered sounds add to the sense of the apocalypse. Looking for the musical angle, “Eat Liver!,” “Walk with Me,” “Bossanova," and “Koran” promote Laibach’s female co-vocalist Mina Spiler to the forefront for, if not a gentler worldview, an easier-to-digest sense of melody that suggests it’s not always "All Work and No Play"—or at least it doesn’t sound like it is.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Having existed in one form or another for more than 30 years, Laibach have always made music that's deliberately difficult listening. Now they've become “politically engaged as never before,” according to the press materials for 2014’s Spectre. Coming from a collective that have used both fascist and communist ideas (and anything else considered controversial) in their imagery and language, it hardly seems new for Laibach to acknowledge current events of any kind. SPECTRE concerns a global terrorist organization in the world of James Bond, and “The Whistleblowers” is said to allude “to the heroism of the new digital Prometheans of freedom—Bradley Manning, Edward Snowden, Julian Assange.” The music is similarly cold, heavy, and martial. Beats pound, synthesizers signal doom, and triggered sounds add to the sense of the apocalypse. Looking for the musical angle, “Eat Liver!,” “Walk with Me,” “Bossanova," and “Koran” promote Laibach’s female co-vocalist Mina Spiler to the forefront for, if not a gentler worldview, an easier-to-digest sense of melody that suggests it’s not always "All Work and No Play"—or at least it doesn’t sound like it is.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Listinsteve ,

As usual, it took a bit of an adjustment

I have been listening to Laibach since 1987 and even traveled to Slovenija in the dark days before the Internet to see if I could pick up some more stuff. I then backpacked across Europe with LPs in my backpack (amazingly, only dented the corners).

Each and every album they've put out has required a readjustment before I really enjoy them. Sometimes it's more immediate, sometimes it's not. Sometimes the ones that take me longer to warm up to turn out to be my long term favorites (Kapital, for example). Spectre is definitely one of those. I didn't buy it for over a month because I thought I wouldn't like it, yet I now view it as one of their best works ever. Again, I say this having everything they've ever put out (and a few bootlegs too).

Grant Pierce ,

FREAKING AWESOME

Since last year, I've been a huge Laibach fan (thanks, Iron Sky), but when I first heard this album, I thought it was their WORST ALBUM EVER. But over time, as I listened to it again and again, it sounded alot better as I listen to it. That's the one that I've noticed about Laibach albums. They're kind of like beer; when you first try it, it's completely awful, but as you get older, you get addicted to it.

arkM ,

"We are Laibach. Resistance is futile."

A catchy and accessible, hit-laden pop album-for-the masses from Laibach? Not quite, but this one comes closer to being a crossover breakthrough than anything else they've done. Milan Fras' growls mesh well with the sultry female pop vocals from Mina Špiler, and the dirge and bombast has been toned down this time. The overall effect has Laibach firmly planted in KMFDM territory. Purists will decry the evolution of Laibach into musical populists, but then they're missing the point.

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