11 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Despite having much in common—both are ecstatic modern musical forms with a single goal in mind—gospel and dance music historically haven’t gotten along so well. Going back to the disco days, myriad dance pioneers used samples of gospel music, from diva vocals to preacher snippets, to power their sound. Christian dance music, meanwhile, has often lacked in production acumen, simply sounding weak. Yet on Light Up the Dark and Commanders of the Resistance—albums from the funky hip-hop brother/sister team Jekob & Rachael Washington (a.k.a. The Washington Projects)—the music is as utterly contemporary as it is uplifting. For S.T.C., Flatline Remix reworks the duo (which features two of the three siblings from the earlier group Souljahz). The result is surprisingly good electro R&B that flirts with dubstep. And while no one's going to confuse the Flatline crew with Deadmau5, that’s not such a bad thing anyway.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Despite having much in common—both are ecstatic modern musical forms with a single goal in mind—gospel and dance music historically haven’t gotten along so well. Going back to the disco days, myriad dance pioneers used samples of gospel music, from diva vocals to preacher snippets, to power their sound. Christian dance music, meanwhile, has often lacked in production acumen, simply sounding weak. Yet on Light Up the Dark and Commanders of the Resistance—albums from the funky hip-hop brother/sister team Jekob & Rachael Washington (a.k.a. The Washington Projects)—the music is as utterly contemporary as it is uplifting. For S.T.C., Flatline Remix reworks the duo (which features two of the three siblings from the earlier group Souljahz). The result is surprisingly good electro R&B that flirts with dubstep. And while no one's going to confuse the Flatline crew with Deadmau5, that’s not such a bad thing anyway.

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