14 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In tandem with MC Scroobius Pip, Dan Le Sac (a.k.a. Dan Stephens) concocted a heady electronica brew mixing spoken-word antics with über-hip samples and beats. Space Between the Words finds him striking out on his own as a composer/producer, aided by a diverse supporting cast of guest vocalists. Le Sac retains the puckish spirit he showed with Pip, serving up oddly enticing sonic cocktails that blend pop, industrial, house, and chillwave elements with a generous splash of British wit. A throb of erotic longing runs through the album’s eclectic tracks, whether the mood is sweltering (“Good Time Gang War”), exalted (“Cherubs”), or subdued (“Beside”). Le Sac plays the masterful impresario, letting Emmy the Great work her teasing magic in “Memorial,” giving Fraser Rowan room to suavely emote in “Breathing Underwater,” and unleashing Joshua Idehan’s word-slinging flow in “Tuning.” Tunes like “Long Night of Life” (featuring electro-folkie Merz) and “Play Along” (spotlighting newcomer Sarah Williams White) edge into the mainstream with ear-snagging hooks.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In tandem with MC Scroobius Pip, Dan Le Sac (a.k.a. Dan Stephens) concocted a heady electronica brew mixing spoken-word antics with über-hip samples and beats. Space Between the Words finds him striking out on his own as a composer/producer, aided by a diverse supporting cast of guest vocalists. Le Sac retains the puckish spirit he showed with Pip, serving up oddly enticing sonic cocktails that blend pop, industrial, house, and chillwave elements with a generous splash of British wit. A throb of erotic longing runs through the album’s eclectic tracks, whether the mood is sweltering (“Good Time Gang War”), exalted (“Cherubs”), or subdued (“Beside”). Le Sac plays the masterful impresario, letting Emmy the Great work her teasing magic in “Memorial,” giving Fraser Rowan room to suavely emote in “Breathing Underwater,” and unleashing Joshua Idehan’s word-slinging flow in “Tuning.” Tunes like “Long Night of Life” (featuring electro-folkie Merz) and “Play Along” (spotlighting newcomer Sarah Williams White) edge into the mainstream with ear-snagging hooks.

TITLE TIME
14

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