12 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While white musicians such as Paul Butterfield and John Mayall were merging blues with rock, Luther Allison was one of the few true Chicago bluesmen to add rock to the blues from a genuine black perspective. A trip to Europe in the late '70s opened his eyes to the level of acceptance his music had on the continent, and he relocated to Paris, basically turning his back on the U.S. Allison returned to the States in the early '90s, and this was his first U.S. recorded album after a twenty-year hiatus. It's also one of the finest albums of Allison's career. His guitar playing just kills, and he sings with an anguished ferocity on standouts such the title track, "Bad Love" and "Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is." But the whole album is a stone gas from start to finish. It's a fitting testament to the talent of Allison, who died of lung cancer in 1997.

EDITORS’ NOTES

While white musicians such as Paul Butterfield and John Mayall were merging blues with rock, Luther Allison was one of the few true Chicago bluesmen to add rock to the blues from a genuine black perspective. A trip to Europe in the late '70s opened his eyes to the level of acceptance his music had on the continent, and he relocated to Paris, basically turning his back on the U.S. Allison returned to the States in the early '90s, and this was his first U.S. recorded album after a twenty-year hiatus. It's also one of the finest albums of Allison's career. His guitar playing just kills, and he sings with an anguished ferocity on standouts such the title track, "Bad Love" and "Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is." But the whole album is a stone gas from start to finish. It's a fitting testament to the talent of Allison, who died of lung cancer in 1997.

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