13 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A prelude to the breakout success of Sweet Oblivion, Screaming Trees’ major-label debut has all the elements of the band’s sound and produced several of the Trees' most beloved songs. Though they remained deeply ensconced in the psychedelic influences that had formed them, the band members had begun to write big, classic rock songs rather than genre pieces. “Bed of Roses” is one of the most soaring and bittersweet things the Trees ever made, while “Story of Her Fate” shows they could write a pop song without sacrificing the rough edges. Released a few months before Nirvana’s Nevermind took the Seattle scene nationwide, songs like “Beyond This Horizon” and “Time for Light” got a lot of credit for precipitating grunge: credit the Trees tried to duck before it even started to surface. Some of the best material on Uncle Aesthesia completely subverts grunge norms, not only in the sweetly bleak balladry of “Closer” and “Before We Arise” but in the gentle “Disappearing,” which blends trumpets into its haze of Stooges-inspired guitar.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A prelude to the breakout success of Sweet Oblivion, Screaming Trees’ major-label debut has all the elements of the band’s sound and produced several of the Trees' most beloved songs. Though they remained deeply ensconced in the psychedelic influences that had formed them, the band members had begun to write big, classic rock songs rather than genre pieces. “Bed of Roses” is one of the most soaring and bittersweet things the Trees ever made, while “Story of Her Fate” shows they could write a pop song without sacrificing the rough edges. Released a few months before Nirvana’s Nevermind took the Seattle scene nationwide, songs like “Beyond This Horizon” and “Time for Light” got a lot of credit for precipitating grunge: credit the Trees tried to duck before it even started to surface. Some of the best material on Uncle Aesthesia completely subverts grunge norms, not only in the sweetly bleak balladry of “Closer” and “Before We Arise” but in the gentle “Disappearing,” which blends trumpets into its haze of Stooges-inspired guitar.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

elderly woman behind the counter in a big town ,

Lets get some SST

Ok to start out with my review i will say this is a good album every song is good with the exception of one or 2...but the main reason behind this review is that i would like to see some of Screaming Trees' SST albums on here after recently noticing that the Soundgarden collection on iTunes is complete, i understand that Soundgarden is more famous but I would really like to see more Screaming Trees here

shawnnews ,

Never wears off

Once I heard this album I couldn't wait to be thrust into the bright 1990s and onward. This cassette was stolen or lost many times. I bought it back evey time until I bought the CD. So far it hasn't been stolen but if it was I'd buy another one. I still listen to this album and when I do I remember I felt I was riding the crest of a wave about to splash into the big unpredictable adult future. Every track is great!

newtheory ,

Better than that other overrated grunge "masterpiece"

This is easily the best album that came out of the grunge era(just ahead of Superunknown). Every song on this record is fantastic, with cuts like Story of Her Fate, Before We Arise, Bed of Roses, Time For Light, and the title track being the highlights. I have always thought that Nevermind was overrated, and Uncle Anesthesia, Diary, Badmotorfinger, Superunkown, and Dirt were the best albums to be released out of Seattle in the 90's. Buy this album and you will not be disappointed!

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