10 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late '70s, The Rolling Stones had proven they were the world’s greatest rock 'n' roll band a few times over. But the explosion of subterranean cultures in the forms of disco and punk seemed to point to a completely different musical future for the world at large. Enter then: Some Girls, the group's farewell album to the '70s and a storming salute to the power of rhythm and rock 'n' roll. The Stones’ lifelong hero worship of artists like Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed meant that they rarely fattened up their records, keeping them lean and streamlined. Given that, Some Girls is mixed just as raw and live-sounding as anything in their catalog. From the Studio 54 vibrations of "Miss You" and weird boogie of "Shattered" to the ragged riffs of "When the Whip Comes Down" and "Before They Make the Run," Some Girls is a perfect match of aggression, hedonism, and songwriting.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late '70s, The Rolling Stones had proven they were the world’s greatest rock 'n' roll band a few times over. But the explosion of subterranean cultures in the forms of disco and punk seemed to point to a completely different musical future for the world at large. Enter then: Some Girls, the group's farewell album to the '70s and a storming salute to the power of rhythm and rock 'n' roll. The Stones’ lifelong hero worship of artists like Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed meant that they rarely fattened up their records, keeping them lean and streamlined. Given that, Some Girls is mixed just as raw and live-sounding as anything in their catalog. From the Studio 54 vibrations of "Miss You" and weird boogie of "Shattered" to the ragged riffs of "When the Whip Comes Down" and "Before They Make the Run," Some Girls is a perfect match of aggression, hedonism, and songwriting.

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