12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Reverend Horton Heat’s first album was recorded live to tape at Seattle's Reciprocal Recording, where Mudhoney, Soundgarden, and Nirvana had made their early work. Though “Psychobilly Freakout” helped codify the emerging genre of the same name, the Rev’s approach was more traditional than deconstructive. If anything, “Bad Reputation,” “Put It to Me Straight,” and “Baby You Know Who” revive the Western swing of Bob Wills by way of punk and grunge. The album’s core is contained in “It’s a Dark Day,” a murky slow dance that locates the connective tissue among X, The Wipers, and Elvis Presley.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Reverend Horton Heat’s first album was recorded live to tape at Seattle's Reciprocal Recording, where Mudhoney, Soundgarden, and Nirvana had made their early work. Though “Psychobilly Freakout” helped codify the emerging genre of the same name, the Rev’s approach was more traditional than deconstructive. If anything, “Bad Reputation,” “Put It to Me Straight,” and “Baby You Know Who” revive the Western swing of Bob Wills by way of punk and grunge. The album’s core is contained in “It’s a Dark Day,” a murky slow dance that locates the connective tissue among X, The Wipers, and Elvis Presley.

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