11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The San Fernando duo of guitarist/vocalist Lindsey Troy and drummer Julie Edwards don’t care much for proper spelling, but they love primal blues-inflected rock ‘n’ roll as previously played by The White Stripes and The Black Keys, to name two other duos with whom they have plenty in common. The pounding rhythms, the thick and bass-distorted guitar riffs, the handclaps, the unison-backing “oh-oh-oh"s, and the nasty snarl on Troy’s lead-vocalist lips all add up to what modern primitive rock ‘n’ rollers sound like in 2013. This debut album is filled with a grungy, greasy attitude that comes to a satisfying head on the single “Gonna Make My Own Money,” and that percolates steadily throughout “End of the World,” “Walk of Shame,” and “Creeplife.” There are inverted Led Zeppelin riffs, nasty Stooges moments, and an aggression clearly at odds with the story that these two ladies met in a crochet class.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The San Fernando duo of guitarist/vocalist Lindsey Troy and drummer Julie Edwards don’t care much for proper spelling, but they love primal blues-inflected rock ‘n’ roll as previously played by The White Stripes and The Black Keys, to name two other duos with whom they have plenty in common. The pounding rhythms, the thick and bass-distorted guitar riffs, the handclaps, the unison-backing “oh-oh-oh"s, and the nasty snarl on Troy’s lead-vocalist lips all add up to what modern primitive rock ‘n’ rollers sound like in 2013. This debut album is filled with a grungy, greasy attitude that comes to a satisfying head on the single “Gonna Make My Own Money,” and that percolates steadily throughout “End of the World,” “Walk of Shame,” and “Creeplife.” There are inverted Led Zeppelin riffs, nasty Stooges moments, and an aggression clearly at odds with the story that these two ladies met in a crochet class.

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