9 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A tense yet expansive atmosphere pervades Silesia, the third album by Swedish post-rock quartet Jeniferever. Vast snow-capped crags seem to rise above misty ice floes as the band’s slow-building arrangements unfold; lyrics and melodies meld into textures at once granite-solid and moodily indistinct. Singer Kristofer Jonson floats above the tracks with a certain angelic detachment, though he sounds bodily pulled to Earth by the brittle urgency of “Deception Pass.” More typical of Silesia’s exalted grandeur are “Dover” and “Hearths,” defined by their chiming guitar lines and coolly sculpted melodies. Injecting needed rhythmic fire into the tunes is drummer Fredrik Aspelin, who lends a jittery pulse to “The Beat of Our Own Blood” and a clipped marching tempo to “Cathedral Peak.” The album has definite soundtrack overtones, with the title track suggesting Sergio Leone composing for a prog-rock orchestra. While much of the album feels austere, it is never forbidding — Jonson and his bandmates betray enough emotion to make Silesia seem an inviting place to visit.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A tense yet expansive atmosphere pervades Silesia, the third album by Swedish post-rock quartet Jeniferever. Vast snow-capped crags seem to rise above misty ice floes as the band’s slow-building arrangements unfold; lyrics and melodies meld into textures at once granite-solid and moodily indistinct. Singer Kristofer Jonson floats above the tracks with a certain angelic detachment, though he sounds bodily pulled to Earth by the brittle urgency of “Deception Pass.” More typical of Silesia’s exalted grandeur are “Dover” and “Hearths,” defined by their chiming guitar lines and coolly sculpted melodies. Injecting needed rhythmic fire into the tunes is drummer Fredrik Aspelin, who lends a jittery pulse to “The Beat of Our Own Blood” and a clipped marching tempo to “Cathedral Peak.” The album has definite soundtrack overtones, with the title track suggesting Sergio Leone composing for a prog-rock orchestra. While much of the album feels austere, it is never forbidding — Jonson and his bandmates betray enough emotion to make Silesia seem an inviting place to visit.

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Ratings and Reviews

3.9 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Lylat Foxes ,

The Album Cover Depicts This Band's MO Perfectly

lush, ambient yet rough, towering sounds and soaring melodies. Jeniferever really did step up with their third album and i though "Spring Tides" would be a hard song to triumph.

they've also added mroe synths and pianos and strings to their sonic beuaty and jsut more of these just heart-pouring lyrics that arne't the straight cut out emotional bunk, but these memoriabillia stories and vivid lyrics.

a good album for any Sigur Ros, Explosions in the Sky, For a Minor Reflection or any real post-rock/ambient fan. Immerse yourself in this Swedish masterpiece.

Jeff Warrington ,

Absolutely Fantastic

I am a big fan of Jeniferever's "Spring Tides" (especially the track called "Nangijala") and doubted it could be topped. But it has been. Beginning to end, I'm loving ever song on this CD. The title track gives me shivers. "Hearths" is beautiful. Jeniferever is one of those bands that has a very unique and identifable sound. Like Sigur Ros, or Explosions in the Sky, or Mogwai, you'll never mistake a Jeniferever song as someone else's or vice-versa. Would love to see these guys tour the US!

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