11 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Swedish brother/sister duo plunged into darkness on their third album, trading chipper synth-pop and tropical flourishes for trance arpeggios, postmodern sea shanties, and bleak, surrealist lyrics. Karin Dreijer Andersson sings like a possessed robot, and Olof Dreijer's synths are as chilly as a Stockholm winter, but the album bursts with heart and soul. For proof, see the melancholy folktale "Forest Families" or the nearly a cappella "Still Light," which recounts a chilling brush with death.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Swedish brother/sister duo plunged into darkness on their third album, trading chipper synth-pop and tropical flourishes for trance arpeggios, postmodern sea shanties, and bleak, surrealist lyrics. Karin Dreijer Andersson sings like a possessed robot, and Olof Dreijer's synths are as chilly as a Stockholm winter, but the album bursts with heart and soul. For proof, see the melancholy folktale "Forest Families" or the nearly a cappella "Still Light," which recounts a chilling brush with death.

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