Editors’ Notes Caustic, biting, daring—Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 4 was written at the height of Soviet Russia’s artistic censorship and shelved until well after Stalin’s death. It’s clear to hear why: Nelsons and the Boston Symphony Orchestra elucidate this defiant work’s every chilling detail, from the strings’ frenzied playing in the opening movement to the ironic majesty of the Largo. Nelsons ratchets up the tension at the start of Symphony No. 11, “The Year 1905,” which describes the uprising that anticipated the Revolution of 1917. Its second-movement sketch of Russia’s Bloody Sunday shootings is terrifying, and Nelsons pushes his musicians to their technical and emotional limits.

SONG
Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43
Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43: I. Allegretto poco moderato (Live)
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Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43: II. Presto (Live)
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Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43: III. Moderato con moto (Live)
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Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43: IV. Largo (Live)
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Symphony No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 43: V. Allegro (Live)
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Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 "The Year 1905"
Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 "The Year 1905": I. The Palace Square (Adagio) [Live]
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Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 "The Year 1905": II. The Ninth of January (Allegro - Adagio - Allegro - Adagio) [Live]
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Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 "The Year 1905": III. Eternal Memory (Adagio) [Live]
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Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103 "The Year 1905": IV. The Tocsin (Allegro non troppo) [Live]
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