17 Songs, 1 Hour 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Beyond his outrageous antics, his erratic career decisions, and even his association with the mighty Wu-Tang Clan, the most crucial thing to remember about Ol’ Dirty Bastard is that he was a natural-born rapper. He didn’t need a concept; he didn’t even need a pad and paper. Rhymes flowed out of him like water from a spigot. As time goes on it becomes easier to recognize Return to the 36 Chambers for the masterpiece that it is. Simply put, there is no other album in hip-hop that sounds like this. It is full of hunchbacked rhythm and startling sonic turns. Equally important to ODB’s rhymes is his delivery — the grunts and groans and shrieks are what make his flow so singular, and so thrilling. Because ODB had the most extraordinary style of any Wu-Tang member, the RZA gave him beats that are equally extraordinary. Claustrophobic, disjointed, dizzy — nothing about “Shimmy Shimmy Ya,” or “Baby C’mon” or “Raw Hide” adheres to a normative POV. Force yourself to read between the lines of Return to the 36 Chambers, and you will be rewarded with one of rap’s most imaginative and deeply personal statements.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Beyond his outrageous antics, his erratic career decisions, and even his association with the mighty Wu-Tang Clan, the most crucial thing to remember about Ol’ Dirty Bastard is that he was a natural-born rapper. He didn’t need a concept; he didn’t even need a pad and paper. Rhymes flowed out of him like water from a spigot. As time goes on it becomes easier to recognize Return to the 36 Chambers for the masterpiece that it is. Simply put, there is no other album in hip-hop that sounds like this. It is full of hunchbacked rhythm and startling sonic turns. Equally important to ODB’s rhymes is his delivery — the grunts and groans and shrieks are what make his flow so singular, and so thrilling. Because ODB had the most extraordinary style of any Wu-Tang member, the RZA gave him beats that are equally extraordinary. Claustrophobic, disjointed, dizzy — nothing about “Shimmy Shimmy Ya,” or “Baby C’mon” or “Raw Hide” adheres to a normative POV. Force yourself to read between the lines of Return to the 36 Chambers, and you will be rewarded with one of rap’s most imaginative and deeply personal statements.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
218 Ratings

218 Ratings

Da Best Critic 711 ,

A Masterpiece.....

One of the best Wu Tang rappers. Only GZA's Liquid Swords rivals it in the competition of best rap album in 1990....R.I.P to ODB, one of tha best in tha game for all time

Sanchez2175 ,

A Masterpiece

How this has so few ratings and reviews is beyond me. Behind "The Chronic" this is the second greatest rap album of the 90's IMO and that puts it in the top 10 for greatest of all time. The Itunes reviewer gets it right; the grunts, groans and odd other vocalizations combine with the other parts to simply make it work. There was never anyone like ODB and there will never be another like him. He was born to do what he did and he did it as well as anyone ever has. Brooklyn Zoo has some of the tightest verses ever put down. Do yourself a favor if you're a rap or hip/hop fan and download it, you won't be sorry.

BLACKJACK1.0 ,

OLD SCHOOL GREATNESS

O D B was one Wu Tangs great disciples. He is missed. P.S. I still
get that hype feeling when this drops.
New School hip hop does not do that for me. Sorry Lil Wayne, Rick Ross, etc.
Lol.

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