11 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Two veterans of the ‘60s British blues boom, Cream’s Jack Bruce and Procol Harum’s Robin Trower (who released two albums together back in the early 1980s) reunited in 2008. And like any two old friends they pick up where they left off, with strong, solid blues riffs, enviable guitar tones, and Bruce’s distinctive, authoritative vocals, which after a bout with cancer have returned in full force. Bruce has been rightfully hailed for his influence with Eric Clapton and Cream; however, Trower has remained a player’s player, roundly acknowledged by his peers for his Hendrix-inspired tone and emotively pure performances, while sadly neglected by the mainstream. Seven Moons is unlikely to make new converts (unless there’s another sudden blues boom!), though anyone listening to the brooding insistence of  “Distant Places of the Heart,” the passionate grunt of “She’s Not the One” or the pleasing shuffle of “So Far To Yesterday” will hear the same epic greatness that made Trower albums such as Twice Removed from Yesterday and Bridge of Sighs the important releases they were for emerging heavy metal guitarists in the early 1970s.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Two veterans of the ‘60s British blues boom, Cream’s Jack Bruce and Procol Harum’s Robin Trower (who released two albums together back in the early 1980s) reunited in 2008. And like any two old friends they pick up where they left off, with strong, solid blues riffs, enviable guitar tones, and Bruce’s distinctive, authoritative vocals, which after a bout with cancer have returned in full force. Bruce has been rightfully hailed for his influence with Eric Clapton and Cream; however, Trower has remained a player’s player, roundly acknowledged by his peers for his Hendrix-inspired tone and emotively pure performances, while sadly neglected by the mainstream. Seven Moons is unlikely to make new converts (unless there’s another sudden blues boom!), though anyone listening to the brooding insistence of  “Distant Places of the Heart,” the passionate grunt of “She’s Not the One” or the pleasing shuffle of “So Far To Yesterday” will hear the same epic greatness that made Trower albums such as Twice Removed from Yesterday and Bridge of Sighs the important releases they were for emerging heavy metal guitarists in the early 1970s.

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