10 Songs, 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Steve Asheim—the drummer, cofounder, and de facto group leader of Deicide—has called 1997’s Serpents of the Light the peak of the original Deicide lineup. It's easy to see why. The album combines all the different aspects that the group had refined up to that point in their career, going all the way back to the raw and bristling black metal of their teenage years. By this point, black metal had come into vogue, and its resurgence registers in Glen Benton’s new vocal style. While on previous albums he had adopted a guttural growl, songs like “Bastard of Christ” and “Father Baker’s” use a famous double-tracked vocal technique meant to invoke demonic possession. The tighter, colder riffs of “Blame It on God” and “I Am No One” also point toward the influence of Bathory, though Deicide blend those early touchstones with the beefy, blocky rhythms they developed later in their career. If Deicide’s brand of death metal blended American and European influences, then “Serpents of the Light,” “Slave to the Cross,” and “This Is Hell We’re In” are its platonic ideal—a perfect fusion of Slayer and Mayhem.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Steve Asheim—the drummer, cofounder, and de facto group leader of Deicide—has called 1997’s Serpents of the Light the peak of the original Deicide lineup. It's easy to see why. The album combines all the different aspects that the group had refined up to that point in their career, going all the way back to the raw and bristling black metal of their teenage years. By this point, black metal had come into vogue, and its resurgence registers in Glen Benton’s new vocal style. While on previous albums he had adopted a guttural growl, songs like “Bastard of Christ” and “Father Baker’s” use a famous double-tracked vocal technique meant to invoke demonic possession. The tighter, colder riffs of “Blame It on God” and “I Am No One” also point toward the influence of Bathory, though Deicide blend those early touchstones with the beefy, blocky rhythms they developed later in their career. If Deicide’s brand of death metal blended American and European influences, then “Serpents of the Light,” “Slave to the Cross,” and “This Is Hell We’re In” are its platonic ideal—a perfect fusion of Slayer and Mayhem.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
30 Ratings

30 Ratings

bloodtyrant ,

Interesting

Perhaps not the best Deicide album, but it makes a lot of sense, the lyrics anyway, they are quite amuzing(I giggled a few times when I read them) for some reason this album just clicks with me, its quite short(under 30 min) but its worth it, its not really evil but its offending to those religious morons.

slowlyrotting ,

best deicide album

although one can argue their point about any of deicides albums, i think serpents of the light stands out above the rest. i dont think it gets enough credit. my favorite track is believe the lie. check it out for sure

SergeA.Storms ,

Great Album!

This was the last great album with the Hoffman brothers before their descent! All the other albums after this & before The Stench of Redemption (which quite frankly may be their Best Album Ever) should not be counted as part of Deicide's catalog! In Glen & Steve's defense that was a dark period of time for the band apparently due to the Hoffman's unhappiness with their contract with the label & wanting out of it! I hate to say anything negative of the Hoffman brothers after all they are part of 4 excellent albums with Deicide,this being one of them!

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