12 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Among the most distinctive alto saxophonists in jazz, Rudresh Mahanthappa often incorporates Indian musical elements into his playing and compositions. He’s well-known for his collaborations with pianist Vijay Iyer, another American jazz musician with south Asian roots. Mahanthappa’s horn lines dazzle the listener with their melodic and rhythmic twists and turns. On Samdhi he’s joined by an excellent ensemble: guitarist David Gilmour, electric bassist Rich Brown, drummer Damion Reid, and Anand Anantha Krishnan, who performs on mridangam and kanjira, two Indian percussion instruments. “Parakram #1” finds Mahanthappa making an elegant solo statement over a bed of sustained string-like tones produced on his laptop. Following that meditative cut, “Killer” is a high-energy piece that dazzles with its rhythmic complexity and melodic lines. Much of the album follows in this pumped-up fashion, with funk and rock stylings often marking the music. But there are quieter moments, too. “For My Lady” is one of them, with a solo Mahanthappa making a highly personal statement on his alto.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Among the most distinctive alto saxophonists in jazz, Rudresh Mahanthappa often incorporates Indian musical elements into his playing and compositions. He’s well-known for his collaborations with pianist Vijay Iyer, another American jazz musician with south Asian roots. Mahanthappa’s horn lines dazzle the listener with their melodic and rhythmic twists and turns. On Samdhi he’s joined by an excellent ensemble: guitarist David Gilmour, electric bassist Rich Brown, drummer Damion Reid, and Anand Anantha Krishnan, who performs on mridangam and kanjira, two Indian percussion instruments. “Parakram #1” finds Mahanthappa making an elegant solo statement over a bed of sustained string-like tones produced on his laptop. Following that meditative cut, “Killer” is a high-energy piece that dazzles with its rhythmic complexity and melodic lines. Much of the album follows in this pumped-up fashion, with funk and rock stylings often marking the music. But there are quieter moments, too. “For My Lady” is one of them, with a solo Mahanthappa making a highly personal statement on his alto.

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