14 Songs, 1 Hour 8 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This French-Belgian cellist explores the seductive world of 19th-century Paris. Saint-Saëns’ beautiful First Cello Concerto proves the ideal vehicle for her deep, burnished tone (as does the composer’s arranged aria “Mon coeur s’ouvre à ta voix”). But the concerto also displays her sense of fun, its filigree passages dispatched with grace. That sense of style comes to the fore, too, in one of Offenbach’s works for cello, the “Introduction, Prière et Boléro," neglected until now but full of virtuosic zest and operatic grandeur. A guest appearance from tenor Rolando Villazón provides a joyful finale.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This French-Belgian cellist explores the seductive world of 19th-century Paris. Saint-Saëns’ beautiful First Cello Concerto proves the ideal vehicle for her deep, burnished tone (as does the composer’s arranged aria “Mon coeur s’ouvre à ta voix”). But the concerto also displays her sense of fun, its filigree passages dispatched with grace. That sense of style comes to the fore, too, in one of Offenbach’s works for cello, the “Introduction, Prière et Boléro," neglected until now but full of virtuosic zest and operatic grandeur. A guest appearance from tenor Rolando Villazón provides a joyful finale.

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