Editors’ Notes “King of Rock,” the title track of Run-D.M.C.’s second album, posited the rappers as legitimate challengers to rock music’s throne while serving as a reminder that much of the genre’s early pathbreaking was done by black artists. It was a forward-looking stance that predicted the hip-hop world we live in today. King of Rock (1985) added some radio-friendly keyboard sounds to the trio’s thumping minimalist beats, but they hardly changed the essential thrust. “You Talk Too Much” shut down a neighborhood gossip, while “It’s Not Funny” voiced the man in the street’s day-to-day concerns and “You’re Blind” was a pointed plea for uplift. Run-D.M.C.’s wide-open ears, which had already made way for hard-rock guitars on “King,” “Can You Rock It Like This” and the earlier “Rock Box,” also heard how Jamaican styles fit with New York rappers on “Roots, Rap, Reggae,” which features an appearance by dancehall superstar Yellowman.

SONG
Rock the House
1
2:42
 
King of Rock
2
5:14
 
You Talk Too Much
3
5:58
 
Jam-Master Jammin'
4
4:20
 
Roots, Rap, Reggae (feat. Yellowman)
5
3:12
 
Can You Rock It Like This
6
4:29
 
You're Blind
7
5:31
 
It's Not Funny
8
5:35
 
Darryl and Joe (Krush-Groove 3)
9
6:34
 
Slow and Low (Demo)
10
4:26
 
Together Forever (Krush-Groove 4) [Live at Hollis Park '84]
11
3:34
 
Jam-Master Jammin' (Remix) [Long Version]
12
6:44
 
King of Rock (Live from Live Aid)
13
7:26