11 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1976 album sustained Elton John’s international superstardom, for good reason. There’s lots of energy, rocking power chords, and pounding pianos, especially on the Who-ish “Grow Some Funk of Your Own” and the punchy, Bo Diddley-inspired “Billy Bones and the White Bird.” “Feed Me” is a curt cautionary tale about addiction, and “I Feel Like a Bullet (In the Gun of Robert Ford)” is all slow, tender beauty. Elton and the band dance it up on the Caribbean-tinted “Island Girl,” the biggest hit from a set that just won’t sit still.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1976 album sustained Elton John’s international superstardom, for good reason. There’s lots of energy, rocking power chords, and pounding pianos, especially on the Who-ish “Grow Some Funk of Your Own” and the punchy, Bo Diddley-inspired “Billy Bones and the White Bird.” “Feed Me” is a curt cautionary tale about addiction, and “I Feel Like a Bullet (In the Gun of Robert Ford)” is all slow, tender beauty. Elton and the band dance it up on the Caribbean-tinted “Island Girl,” the biggest hit from a set that just won’t sit still.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

KorinaJam ,

Elton’s Most Guitar Oriented Album R-O-C-K-S

The electric guitar dominated the sonic landscape of the 1970s. Elton John added rock guitar maestro Davey Johnstone to the band on his album “Madman Across the Water” and every 70s album that follows had at least a couple tracks that flat out rocked.

It’s no accident that this collection of tunes is called “Rock of the Westies.”

After all, Johnstone’s crunchy hard rock guitar riffs are highlighted throughout. Standout cuts include “Grow Some Funk of Your Own”, “Street Kids”, “Dan Dare” and “Street Kids.” EJ’s songwriting is certainly stronger on other albums, but he never rocked harder than he did on this underrated classic.

More By Elton John