12 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“The world moves on a woman’s hips,” David Byrne yelps on “The Great Curve,” summing up where his band is coming from on their genre-bending fourth album. You can hear them overhaul their nervy post-punk sound under the influence of African polyrhythms—and fearless producer Brian Eno—on “Once In a Lifetime” and “Crosseyed and Painless,” adopting trance-like beats and babbling loops of guitar/keyboards while Byrne chants free-associative lyrics that somehow make perfect sense.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“The world moves on a woman’s hips,” David Byrne yelps on “The Great Curve,” summing up where his band is coming from on their genre-bending fourth album. You can hear them overhaul their nervy post-punk sound under the influence of African polyrhythms—and fearless producer Brian Eno—on “Once In a Lifetime” and “Crosseyed and Painless,” adopting trance-like beats and babbling loops of guitar/keyboards while Byrne chants free-associative lyrics that somehow make perfect sense.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
143 Ratings

143 Ratings

TCB Walsh ,

Their Sgt. Pepper's

Remain in Light is the apotheosis (rock critic word) -- the farthest the Heads took their sound. Like the Beatles who returned to a more rock & roll sound after the Summer of Love, the Talking Heads eventually brought it all back home, but not until they explored a jungle of polyrhythmic big-band euphoria. It's one of those albums that while now 25 years old, still sounds ahead of its time. The hypnotic "Seen and Not Seen" by the way, is one of their all-time best little-known tracks.

The Monolith ,

Kid A of the '80's

Talking Heads album "Remain In Light" is 1980's equal to Radiohead's "Kid A". Both are a little too short. Both have a sort of sonic freak out in their first song. "Born Under Punches" uses bleeps and bloops that sound like Pacman and understandably old computers. And "Everything In Its Right Place" has Yorke's voice mixed and remixed by Greenwood. "Once In A Lifetime" and "Houses In Motion" are 2 of Talking Heads' best songs.

pjoseph ,

Desert Island Disk

The peak of the collaboration between the four members of the Talking Heads and producer Brian Eno. There are sounds on this album that are still innovative 28 years later. They truly started a new genre of music here, blending instruments, rhythmic patterns, and lyrically delivery in ways that influence a wide variety of artists to this day. The new master of this album, overseen by Jerry Harrison brings elements barely head before into sharper focus. Recommended to new and old fans.

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